Chipotle Chicken Recipe {Copycat}

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

I could eat Chipotle every single day.  It’s the one “fast food” restaurant I can visit and feel like I got my money’s worth and didn’t ruin all previous exercise and dietary efforts.  If I haven’t had enough vegetables recently (something that happens over the holidays or when I’m traveling), I can reset my system with a healthful, filling burrito bowl or salad.  If your food allergies aren’t affected by potential cross-contamination, virtually all people with dietary restrictions can find something to eat at Chipotle.

The Marinade

I am not the first person to undertake the quest for Chipotle’s chicken marinade.  Many have come before me, most notably Matt Silverman of ChipotleFan.  His recipe has inspired my version in a very direct sense.  However, I have made it enough times that I think I can offer some original unique insights into the preparation and use of the ingredients as well as the recipe itself. In fact, over time I have developed a lot of useful recipe information as you’ll see below.

Please note: I offer two methods based on whether you choose to soak the dried chiles overnight or use Ancho Chile Powder. Although the two marinades have a different consistency, I have found that the chicken tastes the same either way. Deliciously, of course. I also now have cooking directions based on whether you want a grill/skillet method or a baking method as well as a preferred method each for dark and white chicken.

Recipe Yield

This Chipotle Chicken Recipe will yield about 2 cups of marinade. 1 cup of marinade will flavor 5 pounds of chicken. If you do the math, that means this recipe will give you enough marinade for 10 pounds of chicken. I always use 1 cup right away and freeze the other for later. I have also been known to give away my second cup of marinade to a friend to share my joy in this recipe. Either way, because this recipe is somewhat labor-intensive, it’s nice to get a huge batch of marinade out of it.

Marinade Method 1: Soaking Dried Ancho Chiles

Soaking the dried ancho chiles takes some time – at least 12 hours. The longer you soak them, the more water they absorb, and the more marinade you wind up with (to a point, anyway). Once the chiles are soft, I like to open them up, remove the stems, and rinse out the seeds.  For additional heat, add in seeds from the chipotle peppers.

Marinade Method 2: Using Ancho Chile Powder

Ancho Chile Pepper powder is available for purchase, or you may make your own.  1/4 c. of the powder is equivalent to 2 oz. of the peppers (stems and seeds removed, ground up).  However, as one helpful reader pointed out, you won’t wind up with 2 cups of marinade if you simply use Ancho Chile Powder. The process of soaking the dried chiles adds more liquid to the marinade, so you need to add that in if you are using the powder.

I have tested this, and it’s pretty easy to compensate for the missing liquid. Once your marinade is finished (the last step is adding the oil), pour the marinade into a measuring cup. If you don’t have quite 2 cups, add water until you do. This marinade will SEEM runny, but it works just as well. And it should: There is a lot of water in the chiles when you soak them overnight in Method 1. Obviously you can add water to your Ancho Chile Powder.

I would love to be able to tell you exactly how much water to add, but as you’ll find out in the next section, the yield of Adobo Sauce varies widely by brand.

Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce

If you aren’t familiar with Chipotles in Adobo, this ingredient gives food a distinct smoky taste. You only need the Adobo sauce for this recipe, not the chipotle peppers (you can discard them or use them in another recipe such as my Vegetarian Stuffed Peppers). I use a strainer to separate the peppers and seeds from the adobo. I definitely recommend wearing latex or vinyl gloves during this process.

There are many brands of Chipotle Peppers in Adobo Sauce. It turns out that some brands have more chipotles in the can, others have more adobo in the can. You should be able to extract at least 1/4 cup of adobo sauce out of any 7-ounce can you buy, but Embasa in particular has 1/2 cup or more of adobo sauce in a 7-ounce can. Why does that matter? If you are using Method 2 above, the amount of water you will add to reach 2 cups will be more or less depending on which brand of chipotle peppers you are using.

A note on gluten in chipotle peppers with adobo sauce: Many brands do not have gluten, especially imported brands such as La Morena and La Costeña.  If gluten is of interest to you, please read the label before moving forward as some contain wheat.

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

The Chicken

Chipotle uses boneless, skinless chicken thighs which yields tender, juicy pieces of chicken.  However, I have also tested this recipe with boneless, skinless chicken breasts and have some tips on cooking that, too.

Cooking Method 1: Grilling or Stove-top Cooking (Preferred for Dark Meat)

Grilling is a great option if you have the equipment and talents.  I have neither.  I have tried using a flat-top indoor cast-iron grill with a foil-covered brick (to flatten the chicken; please see the following paragraph) and a large cast-iron skillet with a cover.  I preferred the skillet because it helps prevent a lot of grease and marinade spatters.  Also, being able to cover the skillet meant the chicken could cook through more easily.  Last, the cast iron skillet collected bits of fond which contributed to the most delicious, caramelized pieces of chicken in the whole batch.  This was probably true with the cast iron grill pan as well, but I was so concerned about grease splattering that I failed to appreciate the fond in that instance.

Tangent: the foil-covered brick.  Other Chipotle Chicken recipes recommend flattening your chicken with a brick. Yes, I went to the gardening section of my local discount store and picked up a paver for forty-eight cents.  I covered it in foil.  I laid it on my cooking chicken in various stages.  I found the whole thing to be very awkward and scary.  For one thing, the brick became extremely slippery.  So here I am, trying to pick up this slippery brick while standing over an extremely hot cooking surface that is covered in splattering oil.  Not a pretty picture.  Add a curious toddler and you officially have a recipe for a disaster!  If you’re really into that sort of thing, a safer idea is to invest in a cast-iron grill press.  It has a handle and has other uses as well if you’re into grilled sandwiches. I, for one, am definitely into grilled sandwiches.

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

Cooking Method 2: Baking (Preferred for White Meat)

If you want to go the boneless, skinless chicken breast route, great! It turns out there is a fool-proof method for tender, juicy chicken breasts. Who knew? Place the marinated chicken breasts in a baking dish and cover with parchment paper, tucking the paper around the sides so the chicken is completely covered. It works like a charm!

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

I feel like you need a matrix for all the possible ways you could make chicken with this marinade. Just remember, no matter how you marinate it or cook it, it’s going to be great!

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

Chipotle Chicken Recipe (Copycat)

Yield: 12

Prep Time: 10 minutes + 12 hours soak time

Cook Time: 1 hour + 8 hours marinating time

Total Time: 1 hour 10 min + soak time + marinating time

Make your own Chipotle Chicken recipe at home! This recipe yields 2 cups of marinade, enough for 10 lbs. chicken. Make some now, freeze some for later!

Ingredients:

  • 1 (2 oz.) package dried ancho chiles, soaked at least 12 hours (see notes)
  • 1 (7 oz.) can chipotle peppers in adobo sauce
  • 1 red onion, coarsely chopped
  • 6 cloves garlic
  • 2 tsp. cumin
  • 2 tsp. dried oregano
  • Salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/4 cup canola oil, plus more for oiling the cooking surface
  • 5 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken, trimmed

Directions:

  1. Split open each softened ancho chile and rinse the inside to the stem and all seeds (wearing gloves is recommended). Place in the bowl of a food processor or blender.
  2. Strain adobo sauce into a small bowl, discarding peppers or reserving for another use. Press down on the peppers to extract as much liquid as possible (you should have at least ¼ c.). For an especially spicy dish, add chipotle pepper seeds to taste. Add strained liquid to the food processor.
  3. Add red onion, garlic, cumin, oregano, 2 T. salt, and 2 tsp. pepper to the food processor. Pulse several times until a coarse paste develops.
  4. With the motor running, pour ¼ c. canola oil through the feeding tube and continue to process until smooth. You should have two cups of marinade. Reserve one cup for immediate use and freeze the remaining for future use.
  5. Meanwhile, place half the chicken in a large freezer-safe plastic bag. Spoon in half the marinade, close the bag, and mash around to distribute. Add in remaining chicken, remaining ½ c. marinade, and repeat the mashing until all chicken is evenly coated. Place the plastic bag in a dish and refrigerate at least 8 hours or overnight.
  6. To cook on a grill, indoor grill pan, or cast iron skillet (preferred method for dark meat), preheat over medium-high heat. Coat with 2 T. canola oil. Grill the chicken in batches, turning occasionally until the internal temperature reaches 165°F on a thermometer and bits of caramelized fond have begun to cling to the outside of the chicken, 10 to 15 minutes. Add 1 - 2 T. oil to your grilling surface between batches.
  7. To bake in the oven (preferred method for white meat), preheat oven to 400°F. Coat a baking dish with oil or nonstick spray and arrange chicken in a single layer. Cover with parchment paper, tucking the paper around the chicken so it is completely covered. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes, until the chicken reaches 165°F when tested with an internal thermometer.
  8. Remove to a cutting board and chop into small pieces. Season to taste with salt. Serve on tortillas or in bowls with additional toppings as desired.

¼ c. Ancho Chili Pepper powder may be substituted for the dried Ancho chiles. Skip step 1 and add the powder with the other spices in Step 3. After processing the marinade in a food processor, pour into a measuring cup. Add water to reach a total of 2 cups of marinade.[br][br]To soak the chiles, place in a bowl and add enough water to cover completely. Top with a small plate or bowl to weigh down the chiles so they are completely submerged.

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60 Responses to “Chipotle Chicken Recipe {Copycat}”

  1. #
    Luci {Luci's Morsels} — January 21, 2014 at 8:39 am

    What a fun theme! And I could feel the fear of the kitchen situation with the brick. Glad everyone survived ! ;) Can’t wait to see the rest of your Chipotle copycats!

    Luci’s Morsels – fashion. food. frivolity.

    • #
      Meggan — January 21, 2014 at 8:49 am

      Yeah, all I can say is the brick thing is not cool. And it’s not just because I’m uncoordinated… although I am. :) This was a fun series to create, and even more so to EAT! I love Chipotle, and I really love being able to eat massive quantities in one sitting.

  2. #
    Janette@culinaryginger — January 21, 2014 at 9:43 am

    Chipotle is the only ‘fast food’ I eat, I would eat this copycat everyday :-)

    • #
      Meggan — January 25, 2014 at 11:14 pm

      I think I’m on 3 weekends in a row making the Chipotle chicken… we just gobble it right up. :) Not sick of it yet! And now that I know I can freeze half the marinade, that makes it so much easier to eat this All.The.Time. :)

    • #
      jodean — March 12, 2014 at 1:03 pm

      if you do use 10lbs if chicken would you double your spices etc? going to have a large party.

    • #
      Meggan — March 12, 2014 at 3:12 pm

      The recipe for the marinade above is enough for 10 lbs. of chicken; you don’t need to double the spices. I talk about it in my post, but not everyone has time to read my babblings. You will end up with 2 cups. of marinade based on my ingredients above (2 oz. dried chiles, 1 can of chipotle peppers, etc.). That is enough for 10 lbs. of chicken. I apologize for the confusion and I’ll try to reword the recipe so it makes more sense. I normally make the whole marinade recipe, freeze half, and cook 5 lbs. of chicken right away. Please let me know if you have any other questions!

  3. #
    Yead — January 22, 2014 at 11:43 am

    This is so delicious. I love this. Great idea.

    • #
      Meggan — January 25, 2014 at 11:15 pm

      Thank you so much Yead, I hope you enjoy it! :)

  4. #
    Laura — March 19, 2014 at 8:25 am

    This recipe is pretty awesome!!!! It’s very very close to Chipotle’s chicken. My husband has been asking forever to make it and I thought I’d never find something even close. I was wrong! I LOVE the ancho chiles and the chipotles!!!! Thank you for this awesome recipe, you now have one happy new fan :))

  5. #
    James — March 24, 2014 at 12:32 pm

    Hi, I would like to make this, however, does it come out very “hot/spicy”? My reason for asking is that I don’t believe the Chipotle Restaurant version is spicy at all. I mean I don’t ever remember it being spicy any time I’ve ordered it at one of their restaurants.

    • #
      Meggan — March 24, 2014 at 12:45 pm

      Hi James, thank you for your question. First, I think “spiciness” is very subjective. If I eat chipotle’s chicken with sour cream and cheese or a burrito shell, it is never spicy because those offset. But if I eat it plain, sometimes it’s spicy. Having said that, I don’t think this marinade is super spicy. It has flavor, but you are using 1 cup of marinade per 5 pounds of chicken. And when you cook it, some of the marinade comes off. At worst, you may find a spicy bite here and there, but not really. My toddler (almost 2) eats it with no problem, and it’s not like we eat jalapenos for fun around here. To minimize the spiciness, be sure to get rid of all possible seeds from your adobo sauce. In the recipe I recommend straining, so you shouldn’t really have any, anyway. Have I answered your question? Or offered any help at all? I hope so. Spicy as in flavorful, yes. Spicy as it hot, no. Not really. Good luck.

  6. #
    Ann — April 10, 2014 at 10:34 pm

    I’m really excited to try out this recipe. Where can I find the chipotle peppers and ancho chiles? Also, since I don’t have a grill, would baking the chicken be an option? TIA!

    • #
      Meggan — April 11, 2014 at 6:37 am

      Hi Ann, thanks for stopping by! Chipotle peppers are at most grocery stores, Walmart, and Target. They will be in the Mexican food aisle near things like green chiles and salsa. Just look for a small can, “chipotle peppers in adobo.” Ancho chiles are not as widely available, but Walmart and grocery stores do have them. They are large, dried chiles (maybe 6″ long or so) usually sold in clear plastic bags. International food markets also often carry them. McCormick also sells a bottle of Ancho Chile Pepper in their “gourmet” line of spices, so you could look for that. I will figure out how much of that spice you will need, if you go that route, and post another reply today letting you know. Just in case. Also some international food markets might sell “bulk” spices, and if so, you could find ancho chile powder there which would also work.

      Last, no problem about the grill! I usually use a cast iron pan now on my stove top. Baking the chicken would certainly work, but you would probably not got as many “caramelized” pieces as you would from a skillet. It will still be delicious and flavorful, I’m sure. If you don’t want to run your oven, you could also cook the chicken in a regular skillet (nonstick or otherwise) on your stovetop. Good luck!

    • #
      Ann — April 16, 2014 at 2:38 pm

      Thank you so much! Everything worked out and it tasted great!

  7. #
    Katie — April 16, 2014 at 6:30 pm

    I made this yesterday – SO GOOD! Thanks for the recipe! Just wondering if you put any of the marinade on the chicken afterwards and it seemed a bit…dry? that’s not the write word, but just not as seasonful as chipotle. Thanks again for the great recipe!

    • #
      Meggan — April 16, 2014 at 6:45 pm

      Hi Katie, I can imagine a lot of scenarios where the chicken might be dry. It hasn’t happened to me, but here are my suggestions. First, make sure you’re using dark meat, because chicken breast will obviously be drier. Also, as you cook the chicken in batches, if your skillet or grill pan seems dry, be sure to add more oil. Also, I appreciate the tip on adobo sauce. I think since you switched to the Adobo seasoning, that probably made your chicken much drier. I wonder if more liquid should be added to the marinade if you aren’t using adobo sauce? I also want to research adobo sauce and look at brands so I can (hopefully) suggest one that doesn’t have gluten. What a bummer! Thanks for your comments, and I hope your next batch is not so dry. I do think swapping the adobo sauce for seasoning was probably the biggest factor, if you followed the rest of the recipe. Thanks for your feedback!

  8. #
    Katie — April 16, 2014 at 6:33 pm

    ALSO….those who are gluten free like me, BE CAREFUL with Adobo sauce…the ones I was looking at had the dreaded wheat in it. SO I actually just got some adobo seasoning instead.

    • #
      Meggan — April 30, 2014 at 12:32 pm

      Hi Katie, I did some investigating and found a few brands of chipotle peppers in adobo without wheat. One is La Morena, the other is La Costena. Both are imported from Mexico and I found them at my local Walmart. I took pictures of the cans, so if for any reason you’d like to see them, just let me know and I can email them to you. Good luck!

  9. #
    Lindsay — April 30, 2014 at 10:39 am

    Meggan, were you able to figure out how much dried Ancho chili powder would be needed in place of the actual chiles?

    • #
      Meggan — April 30, 2014 at 12:24 pm

      Lindsay, yes! Yes I was, sorry for not replying until you reminded me. It’s 1/4 c. of ancho chile powder. Thank you for checking back and sorry for the delay. I’m going to update the recipe now as a standard way to make it going forward. Thanks again!

  10. #
    Sonia Khawaja — July 12, 2014 at 8:25 pm

    I am guessing 1/4 C means 1/4 Cup

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — July 13, 2014 at 9:27 am

      Hi Sonia, you are correct. Going forward I will always write out “cup” instead of abbreviating. Sorry for the confusion!

  11. #
    Sonia Khawaja — July 13, 2014 at 3:25 am

    I am guessing 1/4 C means 1/4 Cup

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — July 13, 2014 at 4:27 pm

      Hi Sonia, you are correct. Going forward I will always write out “cup” instead of abbreviating. Sorry for the confusion!

  12. #
    Kim — September 17, 2014 at 8:23 am

    I made all of this for my bunco gathering and all the gals went crazy! They said it was BETTER than Chipolte. I went on youtube and found a recipe for their medium salsa and used Chipolte Fan’s corn recipe……….it was AWESOME all together. Thanks!

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — September 17, 2014 at 9:08 am

      Love Bunco! :) I am so glad the recipe was a success for you. I am definitely going to look up/work on the salsa recipes too because they are so.good. Thank you for leaving a comment!

  13. #
    Kim — September 17, 2014 at 3:23 pm

    I made all of this for my bunco gathering and all the gals went crazy! They said it was BETTER than Chipolte. I went on youtube and found a recipe for their medium salsa and used Chipolte Fan’s corn recipe……….it was AWESOME all together. Thanks!

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — September 17, 2014 at 4:08 pm

      Love Bunco! :) I am so glad the recipe was a success for you. I am definitely going to look up/work on the salsa recipes too because they are so.good. Thank you for leaving a comment!

  14. #
    katydidindeed — October 13, 2014 at 2:13 am

    Are you using Mediterranean oregano or Mexican oregano?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — October 13, 2014 at 7:53 am

      I used Mediterranean oregano. It’s an excellent point to make though, maybe Mexican oregano would be a better ingredient here.

  15. #
    Matthew Bartley — November 17, 2014 at 7:14 pm

    Loved this chicken. Huge Chipotle fan, and my whole kitchen smells just like the restaurant after cooking this! I would have loved to have grilled the chicken, but my trusty cast-iron pan did just fine. I’m not a big marinade fan, choosing instead to season and perfectly cook meat to make it taste delicious, but this marinade was spot on and worth every minute of the overnight wait. Excellent!

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — November 17, 2014 at 7:16 pm

      Wow, this is high praise! Thank you for taking the time to make the recipe and report back. A happy review doesn’t hurt. :) I am really glad you liked it. I spent a lot of time making this recipe over and over again myself. I too wish I could grill the chicken, but I always use a cast iron pan. Thanks again for your comment.

  16. #
    Jawana — January 7, 2015 at 7:56 am

    This is by far, the best copycat recipe for the Chipotle Chicken dish! All of the spices presented matched perfectly! The only challenge that I had was cooking the chicken in a pan on an electric stove. Cooking it that way (I believe) gave it a gummy consistency. I had to almost burn the chicken for it to become more firmer. The chicken thighs that were used may not have been the best selection choosen. Perhaps grilling it or cooking on a gas stove would have produced better results for me. It’s winter here so I thought I’d try it indoors instead! Really miss my gas stove though. Gas stoves cook so much better. Thank you so much for sharing such an awesome recipe! Splendid!

  17. #
    WeNeedJesus — January 12, 2015 at 1:45 pm

    Recipe was spot on for chicken and white rice..even better than restaurant!! Wow. I did make a quick version of beans and corn salsa for my first time so it would save me time and I could focus on the chicken and rice. I grilled the chicken which really helps to keep authentic flavor. (BBQ on med heat, about 350 deg, flip after 10 min, cook 10 more min, should be done or close. Test with thermometer. 165 degrees in fattest part is safe. Pull it off grill and cover with foil for 7 min or so and dice it up. If it wasn’t 165 degrees, move away from direct flame but maintain bbq heat level for 5 more min, but you shouldn’t need to.) Family LOVES Chipotle and agreed it was awesome. Thank you!!

  18. #
    Artie — January 26, 2015 at 6:32 pm

    Can you explain how to soak the chiles? I don’t see any information in the notes.

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — January 26, 2015 at 6:45 pm

      Hi Artie, I’m so sorry about that! I’ve added information to the notes of the recipe about soaking the chiles. Here is the info: To soak the chiles, place in a bowl and add enough water to cover completely. Top with a small plate or bowl to weigh down the chiles so they are completely submerged.

    • #
      Artie — January 26, 2015 at 6:51 pm

      Thanks! Can’t wait to make this. :)

  19. #
    jGC — January 29, 2015 at 6:07 am

    Should we be using the Mexican oregano or the regular kind? Can we substitute cumin powder for the seeds?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — January 29, 2015 at 8:25 am

      I am using regular oregano because that is what I have. Mexican oregano is probably delicious too, possibly more authentic even, but I haven’t made it that way so I don’t know how different it would taste. I also used cumin powder, not seeds, so I’m sorry that wasn’t clear. I will update the recipe to reflect “ground cumin” so there is no further confusion. Sorry about that! Thanks for your comment!

  20. #
    Tom — January 31, 2015 at 1:02 pm

    When cutting the ancho chile peppers open – do I discard the seeds or the pepper?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — January 31, 2015 at 1:48 pm

      Hi Tom, sorry for the confusion. For the Ancho chile peppers, you rinse out and discard the seeds and also remove the stem after they have been soaked. For the chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, you only use the sauce, so you can discard the chipotle peppers. I hope this helps. Thanks!

  21. #
    Chris — February 1, 2015 at 10:57 am

    How many ancho chile peppers are in a 2 oz package typically?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — February 1, 2015 at 11:44 am

      It varies depending on the size of the peppers, but typically it’s either 2 large or 1 large and 2 small. That’s what I’ve seen in my experience. And “large” would be about 3″ to 4″ long, small would be about 2″ long. I hope this helps!

  22. #
    David Mosseri — March 16, 2015 at 3:36 pm

    how did I end up with only 1 cup?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — March 16, 2015 at 5:16 pm

      1 cup of the marinade? That is incredibly strange if you started with 2 ounces of dried ancho chile peppers, a 7-ounce can of chipotle peppers in adobo, and 1/2 cup oil. The only other variable would be the red onion. I will weigh the red onion the next time I make this so I can advise the size. Each of the main components should account for roughly 25% (1/2 cup) of the total marinade: the soaked ancho chiles, the adobo sauce, the oil, and the red onion.

    • #
      David Mosseri — March 16, 2015 at 5:51 pm

      Wow you’re quick on replies! I followed it to a T. I did use 1/4 cup Ancho pepper powder instead of the 2 oz. It made about 1-1/4 cup total.

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — March 16, 2015 at 5:57 pm

      Okay. Clearly I need to go back to the drawing board on my Ancho Pepper powder conversion, I am so sorry. It clearly needs to be tested again. I do sincerely apologize. Thank you for telling me about this.

    • #
      David Mosseri — March 16, 2015 at 6:04 pm

      LOL Don’t feel bad at all. This is great conversation and it turned out excellent considering I thought it would be almost double potent! You don’t have to apologize at all. Hey, this is free stuff here! I wonder how many fluid ounces you have from the soaking the Ancho peppers?

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — March 16, 2015 at 6:12 pm

      Wow you are so nice! And yes, I too think the water from soaking the peppers has to be the other variable. In terms of spiciness it should be the same because I ground down the chiles to determine how much powder you would need. But I failed to account for the water that the peppers would absorb. But you were short by about 12 ounces. That seems like a lot. I should also provide the weight of the onion. Thanks again for being so understanding.

    • #
      Meggan | Culinary Hill — May 3, 2015 at 10:59 pm

      It took me 2 months, but I finally perfected the Ancho Chile Powder method! I’ve actually added a lot more information to this post including instructions for baking (great for boneless, skinless chicken breasts) and more ideas on adobo sauce. But I digress. Basically, if you’re using the powder, pour your marinade into a measuring cup and just add water until you get to 2 cups of marinade. That’s what we were missing, the water from soaking the chiles. The consistency of the marinade is quite different (it seems runny when you add water), but it works just as well and tastes just as great. That is what I was thinking in my head, but I wanted to test it out and make sure. There are some brands of chipotles in adobo that have more sauce in the can (I discuss this in the post above) so if you chose one of those, you wouldn’t have to add quite as much water. But anyway. Thanks again for pointing out this deficiency so I could correct it!

    • #
      David Mosseri — May 4, 2015 at 5:31 am

      AWESOME!!! THANK YOU!!

  23. #
    jennifer — March 21, 2015 at 4:14 pm

    This is so good! My whole family loved it – even the picky 13 year old! It tastes so much like the real thing. I’m going to try dicing the chicken prior to marinating next time and see how that goes. I used the ancho chili powder and it worked just fine. It takes some time and can be messy – but totally worth it! The cilantro lime rice recipe is also amazing. Thanks for sharing this – now I need a good recipe for their hot salsa! :)

  24. #
    Brannon Smith — March 27, 2015 at 12:26 pm

    I am a weightlifter and a Chipotle ADDICT. Thank you so, so much for this recipe. It is delicious and very easy to follow for a not-so-great cook like myself lol

  25. #
    Dawn — April 1, 2015 at 11:52 am

    Would the chicken retain the same flavor if I cooked the marinated chicken in the Crock Pot or would I have to grill them? I’m a cooking novice but I’d like to make Chipotle burritos for my boyfriend’s birthday. :)

  26. #
    Rachele — April 7, 2015 at 3:56 am

    These recipes are fantastic!!! We just made this amazing chipotle chicken, cilantro lime rice, slow cooker black beans, peppers and onions, and guacamole. It was so very close to chipotle, almost better!! (Because we have leftovers for tonight!!). Thank you for sharing these recipes with us. We love chipotle and are so thrilled to be able to recreate our favorite foods at home.

  27. #
    Ryan Stolte-Sawa — May 8, 2015 at 9:27 am

    Yes! Excellent! Really delicious! Thank you so much for this!

    I only had a couple of ancho chilies on hand, so I substituted mulatto chilies to weight. I’m not sure how this compares to anchos only, but the flavour I came out with is great. I’ve also seared my first batch in a cast iron pan with a lodge grill press to very fine effect, but it was super messy so I’ll be grilling the rest outside. Mmm, love that Maillard browning!

    FYI: I couldn’t wait two days to taste this chicken, so I used a technique I picked up from another recipe to soften those chilies up in a fraction of the time: I stemmed and seeded and then toasted them all in a dry pan, stirring frequently until fragrant but not smoking, about five minutes, and then microwaved them in a quart of water and two additional tablespoons of adobo sauce for about 6 minutes to soften them. I then used about a quarter cup of that water to rinse the sauce from the chipotle chilis into the food processor to maximize flavour. Feel free to give this procedure a try and report back—it shaved 12 hours off the wait!

    • #
      meggan — May 11, 2015 at 10:06 pm

      Ryan, thank you so much for your amazing comment! You are adding value here left and right. :) So first, I’ve never had a mulatto chile but I will definitely see if I can find them! If only for “research” purposes and also because I’m curious. And thank you a million times over for your super-soak technique. I am definitely going to be testing that out so I can add it to my post. That is perhaps the last stone unturned for me, beating the soaking time on those chiles. That’s awesome! Thank you so much! I can’t wait to try it out. I will comment again and let you know when that happens!

  28. #
    Jonathan — May 17, 2015 at 2:01 pm

    You said “2 T. of salt”, did you mean tablespoons or teaspoons? I did two tablespoons, and the marinade was super salty. However, once I marinated the chicken and grilled it, the chicken tasted fantastic. 

    • #
      meggan — May 18, 2015 at 7:57 am

      Hi Jonathan, I did mean 2 Tablespoons. And I would say the same thing as you – the marinade tastes super salty, but the final chicken does not. It sounds like a lot of salt, but when you remember that 2 tablespoons is supposed to season 10 pounds of chicken total, it sounds slightly less crazy… I think. Glad you liked it!!

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