Pulled Pork Eggs Benedict is the ultimate breakfast experience: barbecue pulled pork, English muffins, poached eggs, and plenty of Hollandaise!

Pulled pork eggs benedict with a side of breakfast potatoes.
Table of Contents
  1. Ingredient notes
  2. Step-by-step instructions
  3. Recipe tips and variations
  4. Pulled Pork Eggs Benedict Recipe

Ingredient notes

  • Hollandaise sauceIf your sauce looks grainy or curdled, it probably got too hot. Try pulling it off the double-boiler immediately to cool it down or stir in a small amount of cool water. If your emulsion isn’t forming, there are a few possible reasons: the yolks might be too hot or too cold, the butter might be too hot or too cold, you added too much butter too fast, or didn’t whisk quickly enough. If your yolks are a very pale pink rather than pale yellow, you may have left the whites in with your yolks. If your Hollandaise was perfect, but now it’s breaking, it may have gotten too hot. Try, try again!
  • Poached eggsDon’t skimp on hot water for poaching eggs; the eggs need enough room to cook. I recommend adding vinegar to the poaching water to help the egg whites stay with the yolk.
  • Tabasco sauce or cayenne pepper: Add to taste (I like ⅛ teaspoon) or omit entirely if you don’t dig spice.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. To make the Hollandaise sauceset a glass or metal bowl over a pot of gently simmering water (do not let the water touch the bowl). Add the egg yolks to the bowl. Using a metal whisk or wire whip, whisk the yolks constantly without overcooking the yolks.
Making hollandaise sauce in a glass bowl.
  1. Remove from heat and immediately stir in lemon juice. Off the heat, set a kitchen towel over pot of water and set bowl on top. Starting with just a few drops at a time, whisk in the warmed clarified butter.
Making hollandaise sauce in a glass bowl.
  1. Once all of the butter has been added, season to taste with salt, tabasco or cayenne pepper (if using). Use immediately or set aside in a warm (but not hot) place for up to 1 hour.
Making hollandaise sauce in a glass bowl.
  1. To poach the eggs, adjust oven rack to be about 6 inches away from broiler and heat broiler. Into a mesh strainer, crack each egg one at a time to strain some of the watery excess egg white, about 20 to 30 seconds. Pour each egg into individual small bowls.
Eggs draining in a sieve before poaching.
  1. In a Dutch oven or large pot, fill halfway with water, with about 6 cups, and bring to a boil. Add the vinegar. Reduce heat to a gentle simmer. While water is heating, set a second large pot filled halfway up with water and heat until the water reaches 150 degrees, remove the pot from heat, and cover to keep warm. The second pot is to keep the poached eggs warm. Carefully drop one egg into the water at a time into the vinegar water, leaving space between them.
Dropping eggs into vinegar water for poaching.
  1. Cook until whites closest to yolk begin to set, or until the desired doneness, about 2 minutes. Remove using a slotted spoon and transfer to 150-degree pot and cover to keep warm.
Lifting a poached egg out of a pot of water with a slotted spoon.
  1. To assemble the Pulled Pork Eggs Benedict, arrange English muffin halves face up on a rimmed baking sheet. Broil until golden brown, about 2 to 4 minutes. Remove sheet from oven and top each muffin with ¼ cup hot pulled pork. Working with one poached egg at a time, remove from the water and allow to drain. Gently set on top of each muffin half. Spoon 1 to 2 tablespoons of hollandaise over the top of each of the eggs and garnish with sliced chives if desired. Serve, passing remaining hollandaise separately.
Pulled pork eggs benedict with a side of breakfast potatoes.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: This recipe makes 4 servings of Pulled Pork Benedicts, 2 Benedicts each.
  • Make ahead: The Hollandaise sauce can be made up to 1 hour in advance. Keep in a warm (but not hot) place. To make the poached eggs in advance, undercook the eggs by about 1 minute, then place the poached eggs in an ice water bath to cool. Store eggs in cold water in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Heat them up in a little hot water for 20 to 30 seconds or until warm.
  • Eggs any style: Poached eggs are classic, but you can change up the style. Fried eggs and scrambled eggs are tasty with hollandaise, too!
  • California Benedict: Substitute a slice of tomato and avocado for the Canadian bacon.
  • Irish Benedict: Substitute corned beef for the Canadian bacon.
  • Eggs Blackstone: Add fried bacon and a slice of tomato.
  • Eggs Florentine: Add spinach instead of, or in addition to, the Canadian bacon.
  • Eggs Royale: Substitute smoked salmon for the Canadian bacon.
Pulled pork eggs benedict with a side of breakfast potatoes.

More hearty breakfast recipes

Pulled pork eggs benedict with a side of breakfast potatoes.

Pulled Pork Eggs Benedict

Pulled Pork Eggs Benedict is the ultimate breakfast experience: barbecue pulled pork, English muffins, poached eggs, and plenty of Hollandaise!
5 from 4 votes
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 35 mins
Servings 4 servings
Course Breakfast
Cuisine American
Calories 864

Ingredients 

For the hollandaise (see note 1):

  • 3 egg yolks
  • 1 tablespoon water
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 8 ounces clarified butter warm
  • Salt to taste
  • Tabasco sauce or cayenne pepper, to taste (see note 2)

For the poached eggs (see note 3):

  • 1 tablespoon white vinegar
  • 8 eggs

For the Eggs Benedict:

  • 4 English muffins split and toasted
  • 2 cups barbecue pulled pork hot
  • Minced freshly parsley for garnish, optional

Instructions 

To make the Hollandaise:

  • Set a glass or metal bowl over a pot of gently simmering water to make a double boiler (do not let the water touch the bowl). 
  • Add egg yolks to the bowl. Using a metal whisk or wire whip, whisk the yolks constantly without overcooking the yolks. You’ll know the yolks have thickened enough when you can draw a line through the yolks and yolks stay put. The line does not fill in.
  • Remove from heat and immediately stir in lemon juice. Off the heat, set a kitchen towel over pot of water and set bowl on top. Starting with just a few drops at a time, whisk in the warmed clarified butter. Once the emulsion has formed, you can add butter more quickly.
  • Once all the butter has been added, taste for seasonings. Add salt and tabasco or cayenne pepper if desired. Set aside in a warm (but not hot) place until you are ready to assemble the Eggs Benedict. If the sauce appears too thick, whisk in a few drops of warm water until desired consistency is reached.

To poach the eggs:

  • Adjust oven rack to be about 6 inches away from broiler and heat broiler. Into a mesh strainer, crack each egg one at a time to strain some of the excess egg white, about 20 to 30 seconds. Pour each egg into individual small bowls.
  • Fill a Dutch oven or large pot halfway with water, about 6 cups, and bring to a boil. Add vinegar and bring to a simmer with small bubbles barely breaking the surface, about 200 degrees. Hold this temperature.
  • While water is heating, set a second large pot filled halfway up with water and heat until the water reaches 150 degrees, remove pot from heat and cover to keep warm. The second pot is to keep the poached eggs warm.
  • Crack eggs into separate ramekins, small bowls, or tea cups. Gently drop one egg into the water at a time, leaving space between them. Cover pot, remove from heat, and let stand until whites closest to the yolk are just set and opaque, about 3 minutes (or 4 minutes for medium-cooked yolks or 6 minutes for hard-cooked yolks).
  • If the whites are not set after 3 minutes, continue checking every 30 seconds. Using a slotted spoon, carefully lift each egg out and transfer to the pot with the 150-degree water to keep warm.

To make the Eggs Benedict:

  • Arrange English muffin halves face up on a rimmed baking sheet. Broil until golden brown, about 2 to 4 minutes. Remove baking sheet from oven.
  • Top each English muffin with ¼ cup hot pulled pork. Working with one at a time, remove a poached egg from water and allow to drain. Gently set on top each muffin half. Spoon 1 to 2 tablespoons of hollandaise over the top of each of the eggs and garnish with parsley if desired. Serve, passing remaining hollandaise separately.

Notes

  1. Hollandaise sauceIf your sauce looks grainy or curdled, it probably got too hot. Try pulling it off the double-boiler immediately to cool it down or stir in a small amount of cool water. If your emulsion isn’t forming, there are a few possible reasons: the yolks might be too hot or too cold, the butter might be too hot or too cold, you added too much butter too fast, or didn’t whisk quickly enough. If your yolks are a very pale pink rather than pale yellow, you may have left the whites in with your yolks. If your Hollandaise was perfect, but now it’s breaking, it may have gotten too hot. Try, try again!
  2. Tabasco sauce or cayenne pepper: Add to taste (I like ⅛ teaspoon) or omit entirely if you don’t dig spice.
  3. Poached eggs: Don’t skimp on hot water for poaching eggs; the eggs need enough room to cook. I recommend adding vinegar to the poaching water to help the egg whites stay with the yolk.
  4. Yield: This recipe makes 4 servings of Pulled Pork Benedicts, 2 Benedicts each.
  5. Make ahead: The Hollandaise sauce can be made up to 1 hour in advance. Keep in a warm (but not hot) place. To make the poached eggs in advance, undercook the eggs by about 1 minute, then place the poached eggs in an ice water bath to cool. Store eggs in cold water in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. Heat them up in a little hot water for 20 to 30 seconds or until warm.
  6. Eggs any style: Poached eggs are classic, but you can change up the style. Fried eggs and scrambled eggs are tasty with hollandaise, too!
  7. California Benedict: Substitute a slice of tomato and avocado for the Canadian bacon.
  8. Irish Benedict: Substitute corned beef for the Canadian bacon.
  9. Eggs Blackstone: Add fried bacon and a slice of tomato.
  10. Eggs Florentine: Add spinach instead of, or in addition to, the Canadian bacon.
  11. Eggs Royale: Substitute smoked salmon for the Canadian bacon.

Nutrition

Serving: 2eggsCalories: 864kcalCarbohydrates: 27gProtein: 26gFat: 72gSaturated Fat: 40gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 648mgSodium: 430mgPotassium: 358mgFiber: 2gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 673IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 103mgIron: 3mg
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Comments

  1. The nutrition info says that this has 94 carbs per serving? Is that a misprint? The pulled pork recipe only has about 20 carbs per serving. The only other ‘carby’ thing is the English muffin and one of those is about 25 carbs.
    My T1 diabetic husband had this in a restaurant and it did not spike his blood sugar so I thought that I’d love to make it. But he could never handle 94 carbs.
    Thanks.

    1. Hi Marie, I’m so sorry for the confusion. I took a look at the back-end of the nutrition label and it was a complete disaster. The pork wasn’t even being counted and the recipe was counting 8 English muffins instead of 4. I have updated the label so it is much more accurate. I would say a lot of carbs are probably coming from the barbecue sauce, so you can definitely keep that under control by choosing a low-sugar version or making your own. Right now the label is saying 49.8g of carbs. I hope this is helpful, it’s probably not perfect but it’s better than it was! Thank you so much for your question and I’m so sorry about all of this. Thanks. -Meggan

  2. I love how you mention lying awake dreaming about food! I do that! I do that!

    But this really is the stuff (food) dreams are made of. This reminds me of something you’d get served on that show on the food network ‘Diners, Drive-ins and Dives’ (or something like that). They always have slow-cooked stuff with mountains of other delicious ‘stuff’ added.

    Can you set the breakfast table for one more next weekend, please?5 stars