An easy Bread Stuffing made with all the classic flavors. Baked outside the bird but still buttery and moist, this recipe tastes just like Mom used to make!

Classic bread stuffing in a white baking dish.

This stuffing is rich and savory, soft but with crispy edges. There are some vegetables, but nothing so strange that it changes the overall texture.

There are no walnuts, pears, or gorgonzola. There are no jalapeños nor bacon. It’s traditional, like your mom’s or grandma’s maybe, and I hope you love it as much a I do.

Table of Contents
  1. Recipe ingredients
  2. Ingredient notes
  3. Step-by-step instructions
  4. Recipe tips and variations
  5. Bread Stuffing Recipe

Recipe ingredients

Labeled ingredients for classic bread stuffing in various bowls.

Ingredient notes

  • Chicken broth: I keep jars of homemade chicken broth in the freezer (it’s a delicious by-product of poaching a chicken), but store-bought is also good. Or use turkey broth if you have that.
  • Herbs: Fresh herbs taste the best in this stuffing, but dried work too. I rarely find fresh marjoram and almost always substitute dried.
  • French bread: You can also use brioche, challah, or Italian bread. Dry the bread up to 3 days in advance (keep it covered with a dry kitchen towel on counter, or slice and dry in a 300-degree oven for 30 to 40 minutes).

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Coat a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish with butter. In large skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter until foaming. Add onion and celery and sauté until softened, about 7 to 8 minutes.
Onion and celery cooking in a skilet.
  1. Meanwhile, whisk eggs in large bowl. Stir in broth, 1 teaspoon salt, and ½ teaspoon pepper.
A bowl with chicken broth, eggs, and spices to make stuffing.
  1. To skillet, add parsley, sage, thyme, and marjoram until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Transfer to bowl with eggs and mix well. Add bread cubes and toss to combine.
Bread stuffing in a bowl before baking.
  1. Transfer to prepared baking dish. Cover tightly with foil and bake until mostly heated through, about 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake until crispy edges form, about 15 to 20 minutes longer.
Bread stuffing in a baking dish after baking.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: This recipe will serve at least 10 as a side dish.
  • Storage: Store leftovers covered in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.
  • Make ahead: After you’ve assembled the stuffing, refrigerate it up to 1 day in advance. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Keep stuffing tightly covered with foil and bake until mostly heated through, about 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake until crispy edges form, about 10 to 20 minutes longer.
  • Small batch: Stuffing for two is perfect for a couple.
  • Stuffing a turkeychicken, or hen: For food safety reasons, and for a more evenly cooked bird, most modern recipes don’t encourage stuffing a turkey. If you decide to stuff your turkey, make sure the stuffing is warm when it goes in so it has a head start in cooking (either because you just finished making it, or because you made it in advance and reheated it). Use a large spoon or your hands to loosely stuff the body and neck cavities (do not pack it tightly because the stuffing expands while it cooks). Truss the main cavity with trussing pins to keep the stuffing inside. The stuffing must register 165 degrees on an internal thermometer to be safe to eat.
A plate of roasted trukey, stuffing, vegetables, mashed potatoes and gravy, and cranberries.

More Thanksgiving recipes

Classic bread stuffing in a white baking dish.

Bread Stuffing

An easy Bread Stuffing made with all the classic flavors. Baked outside the bird but still buttery and moist, this recipe tastes just like Mom used to make!
5 from 26 votes
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 50 mins
Total Time 1 hr 10 mins
Servings 10 servings
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Calories 231

Ingredients 

  • 1/2 cup butter (1 stick) plus more for buttering dish
  • 1 large onion chopped
  • 4 celery ribs halved lengthwise and chopped
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 cups chicken broth (see note 1)
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley minced (see note 2)
  • 1 teaspoon fresh sage minced, or ½ teaspoon dried
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme minced, or ½ teaspoon dried
  • 1 teaspoon fresh marjoram minced, or ½ teaspoon dried
  • 1 loaf French bread cut into 1/2-inch cubes and dried overnight on counter (about 1 pound, see note 3)

Instructions 

  • Adjust oven rack to middle position and preheat to 400 degrees. Coat a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish with butter.
  • In large skillet over medium-high heat, melt butter until foaming. Add onion and celery and sauté until translucent, about 7 to 8 minutes. Meanwhile, whisk eggs in large bowl. Stir in broth, 1 teaspoon salt, and ½ teaspoon pepper.
  • To skillet, add parsley, sage, thyme, and marjoram until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Transfer to bowl with eggs and mix well. Add bread cubes and toss to combine. Transfer to prepared baking dish.
  • Cover tightly with foil and bake until mostly heated through, about 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake until crispy edges form, about 15 to 20 minutes longer.

Recipe Video

Notes

  1. Chicken broth: I keep jars of homemade chicken broth in the freezer (it’s a delicious by-product of poaching a chicken), but store-bought is also good. Or use turkey broth if you have that.
  2. Herbs: Fresh herbs taste the best in this stuffing, but dried work too. I rarely find fresh marjoram and almost always substitute dried.
  3. French bread: You can also use brioche, challah, or Italian bread. Dry the bread up to 3 days in advance (keep it covered with a dry kitchen towel on counter, or slice and dry in a 300-degree oven for 30 to 40 minutes).
  4. Yield: This recipe will serve at least 10 as a side dish.
  5. Storage: Store leftovers covered in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.
  6. Make ahead: After you’ve assembled the stuffing, refrigerate it up to 1 day in advance. When ready to bake, preheat oven to 400 degrees. Keep stuffing tightly covered with foil and bake until mostly heated through, about 25 minutes. Remove foil and bake until crispy edges form, about 10 to 20 minutes longer.
  7. Small batch: Stuffing for two is perfect for a couple.
  8. Stuffing a turkeychicken, or hen: For food safety reasons, and for a more evenly cooked bird, most modern recipes don’t encourage stuffing a turkey. If you decide to stuff your turkey, make sure the stuffing is warm when it goes in so it has a head start in cooking (either because you just finished making it, or because you made it in advance and reheated it). Use a large spoon or your hands to loosely stuff the body and neck cavities (do not pack it tightly because the stuffing expands while it cooks). Truss the main cavity with trussing pins to keep the stuffing inside. The stuffing must register 165 degrees on an internal thermometer to be safe to eat.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cupCalories: 231kcalCarbohydrates: 25gProtein: 7gFat: 12gSaturated Fat: 7gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 80mgSodium: 495mgPotassium: 194mgFiber: 2gSugar: 2gVitamin A: 701IUVitamin C: 9mgCalcium: 48mgIron: 2mg
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Comments

  1. Hi Meggan! Thanks for posting! This looks just like the stuffing I had at Thanksgiving dinner growing up. It’s my first year hosting and I’m going to take a crack at this recipe. Would french baguettes work for this recipe? I couldn’t find a larger loaf of french bread at either of the grocery stores I hit yesterday. I’m afraid the baguette will be TOO hard if I leave it out to “dry.” Thanks for any info!

    1. Hi Rachel, I’m making this today with your variaron and I’ll reply and let you know how French baguettes work out!

    2. Hi Rachel! The French baguettes work great! You’ll want 2 baguettes, 8 ounces each, to get 10 cups loosely packed bread cubes or 8 cups of firmly packed (as in smashing them down) cubes. I cut my baguettes into 1-inch or 1 1/2-inch cubes. I used to do 1/2 cubes but that’s super tiny and annoying, so now I do bigger pieces (and with baguettes you could even tear them if you want). Other information: I dried the baguettes in the oven per the method in the recipe (225 degrees for 30 minutes). When they came out, they were mostly like little rocks, so I understand your fear! But once you put them in the broth/vegetable/egg mixture, they soften just like regular bread. The recipe performs exactly the same as with French bread (I know this because I’m also making the French bread version today). I will say that the pieces of bread on top are drier than the ones on the bottom. If you pick off a cube of bread from the top and eat it, you might think “oh no! This is way too dry!” But honestly having those crispy-edged, slightly browned pieces on top is a really nice contrast to all the soft pieces underneath. When you eat them together, it’s perfect. A little bit of crunch here and there. :) And it’s not because it’s baguette – that’s just how the recipe is. If everything was soggy, you wouldn’t get any crunch. Okay, I’ve officially beaten this horse to death, so good luck and PLEASE let me know if you have any other questions! Good luck! I’ll email this message to you too, just in case my reply to the comment goes to your spam. Happy Thanksgiving! -Meggan

  2. This is really good. However, i add bell pepper, and shredded chicken breast, and omit the parsley, tyme, and marjoram. Everyone loves it!5 stars

  3. This is the same receipt my mother cooked for our family. Don’t know if it came from her mother or U of Wisc. in the early 1920’s. However she did not cover during baking…instead drizzling white wine or vermouth about every 1/2 hour or so while the turkey cooked. As my sons grew so did their appetite for dressing. One whole receipt was declared theirs and only theirs!5 stars

  4. This is the fabulous stuffing that my mom and my late wife both made.
    I’ve missed it every year, and now I can have it again. Just wish that I could cook it for them.
    Thank you for this recipe, Meggan! May you have a blessed Thanksgiving!5 stars

    1. Steven, your comment made me tear up!!! This is why I get up in the morning, just hoping that my random (but favorite) stuffing recipe might help somebody out. Your comment is more than I ever could have hoped for! Blessings to you and your family. I hope you had the most wonderful Thanksgiving. -Meggan

    1. Hey there! Yes! You can freeze the baked stuffing for up to 1 month. Store in an airtight container and reheat in a 325-degree oven, covered, for 30 minutes or until warm throughout (the baking time really depends on the amount of stuffing, whether it’s just leftovers or you made the whole thing in advance).