Never battle tough-to-peel boiled eggs again. Learn how to hard-boil eggs so the peel just slides right off and the hard-boiled egg is perfectly cooked underneath.

Hard-boiled eggs in a bowl, one split in half in front.
Table of Contents
  1. Ingredient notes
  2. Step-by-step instructions
  3. Recipe tips and variations
  4. How to Hard Boil Eggs Recipe

Ingredient notes

  • Eggs: It’s a myth that all older eggs are easier to peel than fresh eggs, although sometimes that may happen. Adding eggs to a hot environment fast will definitely break the bond between the egg white and membrane, though, and that is the secret that makes hard-boiled eggs easier to peel.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Fill a saucepan with about 1 inch of water and bring it to a hard boil over high heat. Place the number of eggs you want to cook into the steamer basket and lower it into the pot. Cover the saucepan, turn the heat down to medium-low, and set a timer for 13 minutes.
Eggs hard-boiling in a pot of water.
  1. While the eggs cook, make an ice bath by filling a big bowl with ice and water. When the timer goes off, carefully remove the eggs from the water and place them in the ice bath to cool.
Hard-boiled eggs cooling in an ice bath.
  1. After about 5 minutes, they should be ready to peel and eat. (Or store in the shell if you’re planning to enjoy the hard-boiled eggs later.)
Two hard-boiled eggs peeled on a cutting board.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Storage: Store cooked eggs unpeeled in a covered container in the refrigerator.
  • Leftovers: Use up hard-boiled eggs within 1 week after cooking.
  • Make ahead: Unlike omelets or scrambled eggs, you can absolutely whip these up in advance. Boiled eggs are your best bet if you’re seeking a make-ahead egg recipe.
  • Cooking time: Depending on the altitude, the capacity of the pan, and the size of the eggs you bought, the process can take a few minutes longer, but 13 minutes tended to work well in our test kitchen trials.
  • Mark your eggs: To distinguish them from uncooked eggs, I always make a mark on the hard-boiled egg shell. Use a pencil instead of a marker; the latter can soak through the porous shell and tint the boiled egg white.
  • Steamer basket: If you don’t own a steamer basket, use a spoon or tongs to gently place the eggs in the water. It doesn’t matter if the eggs are above the water or partially submerged. This will work for up to 6 eggs without changing the timing.
  • Instant Pot hard-boiled eggs: Use the multi-cooker to hard-boil up to 12 eggs at once. Add 1 cup water to a 6-quart Instant Pot. Place the appliance’s metal trivet inside the pot, then add the eggs. Select “Manual,” adjust pressure to HIGH, and set time for 6 to 7 minutes. When finished, quick-release the pressure, and cool the eggs in a bowl of ice water for 1 minute. Drain well and peel.
Hard-boiled eggs in a bowl, one split in half in front.

Bonus egg ideas

A hard boiled egg sliced in half lengthwise.

How to Hard Boil Eggs

Never battle tough-to-peel boiled eggs again. Learn how to hard-boil eggs so the peel just slides right off and the hard-boiled egg is perfectly cooked underneath.
0 from 0 votes
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 13 mins
Total Time 18 mins
Servings 6 servings (1 egg each)
Course Snack
Cuisine American
Calories 63

Ingredients 

  • 6 eggs (see note 1)
  • water

Instructions 

  • Fill a medium saucepan with about 1 inch of water (about 2 cups) and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Place eggs in a steamer basket and lower into the saucepan. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook for 13 minutes.
  • Set up an ice bath by filling a large bowl with ice and cold water. When eggs are done, use tongs or a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the hot water and submerge them under the cold water to cool, about 5 minutes.

Notes

  1. Eggs: It’s a myth that all older eggs are easier to peel than fresh eggs, although sometimes that may happen. Adding eggs to a hot environment fast will definitely break the bond between the egg white and membrane, though, and that is the secret that makes hard-boiled eggs easier to peel.
  2. Storage: Store cooked eggs unpeeled in a covered container in the refrigerator.
  3. Leftovers: Use up hard-boiled eggs within 1 week after cooking.
  4. Make ahead: Unlike omelets or scrambled eggs, you can absolutely whip these up in advance. Boiled eggs are your best bet if you’re seeking a make-ahead egg recipe.
  5. Cooking time: Depending on the altitude, the capacity of the pan, and the size of the eggs you bought, the process can take a few minutes longer, but 13 minutes tended to work well in our test kitchen trials.
  6. Mark your eggs: To distinguish them from uncooked eggs, I always make a mark on the hard-boiled egg shell. Use a pencil instead of a marker; the latter can soak through the porous shell and tint the boiled egg white.
  7. Steamer basket: If you don’t own a steamer basket, use a spoon or tongs to gently place the eggs in the water. It doesn’t matter if the eggs are above the water or partially submerged. This will work for up to 6 eggs without changing the timing.
  8. Instant Pot hard-boiled eggs: Use the multi-cooker to hard-boil up to 12 eggs at once. Add 1 cup water to a 6-quart Instant Pot. Place the appliance’s metal trivet inside the pot, then add the eggs. Select “Manual,” adjust pressure to HIGH, and set time for 6 to 7 minutes. When finished, quick-release the pressure, and cool the eggs in a bowl of ice water for 1 minute. Drain well and peel.

Nutrition

Serving: 1eggCalories: 63kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 6gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 164mgSodium: 62mgPotassium: 61mgSugar: 1gVitamin A: 238IUCalcium: 25mgIron: 1mg
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Meggan Hill

I’m the Executive Chef and head of the Culinary Hill Test Kitchen. Every recipe is developed, tested, and approved just for you.

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