Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls

There’s something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all. This is the best dinner roll recipe I’ve found; every bite is super soft, pillowy, and cloud-like.

If you’ve never made yeast rolls before, roll up your sleeves and get ready to bake up a new tradition.

With everything going on during a bustling holiday season, it’s tempting to grab a package of frozen rolls for the table as an afterthought…I’ve certainly done it. Who needs bread, anyways, with all the rest of the food?

I do. And maybe you do, too.

These homemade dinner rolls are so good, I always find myself regretting it if I go with store bought rolls. After all they’re not so difficult to make–the dough spends most of its active time rising, letting the yeast work. All I have to do is gently portion it into balls and guide them into shape every once in awhile.

They’re slightly sweet but not overly so. Wait until you sample one fresh out of the oven, with butter. It’s not just their texture; it’s their taste that is what makes them the best dinner roll recipe around.

This recipe makes up to 32 rolls, so freeze what you don’t need right away to enjoy later on. They warm up perfectly in a low oven.

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all. This is the best dinner roll recipe I've found; every bite is super soft, pillowy, and cloud-like.

Making Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls for a big event? Click and slide the number next to “servings” on the recipe card below to adjust the ingredients to match how many you’re feeding—the recipe does the math for you, it’s that easy.

Is this recipe for No Knead dinner rolls?

There are other recipes out there that claim to be no-knead soft rolls, but I find that they don’t hold up as well the next day or the day after. Since I make a lot when I bake, I want them to last!

Here, I knead the dough using an electric mixer with a dough hook, and it works perfectly. So while technically it’s not a “no-knead” dinner roll recipe, I’m not the one doing the kneading, so…..it’s no-knead to me! They’re about as hands-free as you can get.

Make them on Friday night and you’ll still have super soft dinner rolls on Sunday.

How do you turn all that dough into rolls?

Once the dough is goes through its first rise in the bowl, you punch it down and turn it out onto a clean, dry work surface. Cut the dough into four equal portions. Then you can break each of this portions into eight small portions. Each ball of dough should be about 1 1/4 ounce each. It’s okay–you can eyeball this.

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all.

Next, gently roll each of the small portions of dough into a ball. Shape each portion into a round ball by pushing and turning the palm of your hand in a circular motion against the countertop and place 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets.

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all.

After the dough goes through another short rise in a warm place, you can brush the rolls with the egg wash and bake them for 18 to 20 minutes in a 400-degree oven.

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all.

Can Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls be made ahead of time?

You can make the dough ahead of time, refrigerate it, and let it rise at room temperature until doubled in size, about 1 1/2 hours. Or you can make the rolls up through baking, let them cool, and freeze them in Zip-loc freezer bags.

What’s the difference between active dry yeast and instant yeast?

Unless you’re a diehard baker, it’s hard enough to find where yeast is in the grocery store, let alone figure out which one to use. The difference between the two types of dry yeast is simple: active dry yeast has a larger granule and needs to be dissolved in water before using.  On the other hand, instant yeast has a finer texture and can be mixed right into dry ingredients.

This holiday season, I’ve updated some traditional Christmas recipes to make each bite even better than the next.  From classic Prime Rib with Mustard Cream Sauce to Baked Ham with all the trimmings, every dish on the table is vibrant and bursting with flavor.
I wish you the merriest, most sparkling holiday season ever, and a peaceful, delicious New Year. 

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all. This is the best dinner roll recipe I've found; every bite is super soft, pillowy, and cloud-like.

Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls

There's something so completely magical about warm, freshly-baked bread with holiday meals, but these Soft Yeast Dinner Rolls are the most irresistible of them all. This is the best dinner roll recipe I've found; every bite is super soft, pillowy, and cloud-like. If you've never made yeast rolls before, roll up your sleeves and get ready to bake up a new tradition.

Course Bread
Cuisine American
Keyword bread, yeast
Cook Time 2 hours 20 minutes
Total Time 2 hours 20 minutes
Servings 32 rolls
Calories 109 kcal

Ingredients

  • 4 ½ teaspoons 2 packets Active Dry Yeast
  • 1 ½ cups Warm Water 110-115 degrees
  • 5 ½ cups Bread Flour
  • 1 Tablespoon Salt
  • ¼ cup Sugar
  • 1 Tablespoon Dry Milk Powder
  • 4 Tablespoons Unsalted Butter softened
  • 1 Egg
  • Egg Wash

Instructions

  1. Soften (bloom) the yeast in warm water for 5 minutes.
  2. In a bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, combine flour, salt, sugar, dry milk powder, butter, and egg. With the motor running on low, slowly drizzle in the yeast mixture.
  3. Increase the mixer speed to medium and mix until shiny and smooth, about 10 minutes.
  4. Turn out the dough onto a dry surface and shape into a ball. Place into a lightly greased bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let rise in a warm place (80 to 85 degrees, see notes) until doubled in size, about 1 hour.
  5. Punch down the dough and allow to rest a few minutes for the gluten to relax.
  6. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Turn out the dough onto a dry surface. Using a bench scraper, divide the dough into 4 equal portions and then divide those into 8 equal portions (about 1 ¼ oz each). Shape each portion into a round ball by pushing and turning the palm of your hand in a circular motion against the countertop and place 2 inches apart on prepared baking sheets.

  7. Cover the shaped rolls with a clean kitchen towel and place the baking sheets on top of the oven. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees and proof the shaped rolls until doubled in size, about 30 minutes.
  8. Gently brush the tops with egg wash. Bake until golden brown, about 18-20 minutes, rotating the baking sheets halfway through. Serve warm or allow to cool, place in Ziplock bags, and freeze for another night.

Recipe Notes

To create a warm environment ideal for yeast-rising, preheat your oven to its minimum temperature (170 degrees, 200 degrees), but shut it off once the temperature reaches 110 degrees. Place your dough (in a greased bowl, covered with plastic wrap), on a baking sheet and in the oven. The oven temperature will drop when you open the oven door, but enough residual heat will remain that your dough should steadily rise.


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1 comment

  1. Hi Meggan, these rolls look delicious and I like that they are relatively simple to make. I’m curious though what the purpose of the dried milk powder is. Can it be left out without substantially changing the rolls? I don’t keep dried milk in my pantry and am hesitant to buy it when only one tablespoon is needed. Thanks and Merry Christmas!

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