Pickled Garlic Recipe

If you love pickles and you love garlic, you just found a tasty new best friend. This Pickled Garlic Recipe also makes a great starter canning project! 

“You might as well just ask. What have you got to lose?”

This was what my conscience told me right before I sprang a question on my mother-in-law.

We were discussing the Dilly Beans she made for a church fundraiser and how she would graciously set aside a jar for me as a Christmas gift. Would I like a clove of garlic in my jar of Dilly Beans?

“How about a whole jar of Dilly Garlic?”

A portrait photo of a canning jar of picked garlic. The garlic is in the brine surrounded by dill and chili flakes. There is a bottle of dos exis in the background along with a white bowl, and the jar's lid is to the right of the jar. There is a silver relish fork to the right of the jar.

As you can tell, the answer was yes.

Or as we say in the Midwest: Yah Sure You Betcha!

It seemed natural to me that the best bite in a jar of Dilly Beans, the clove of garlic, might be produced in mass.

I will stand by for correction from my mother-in-law, but I’m pretty sure they have since made jars of Dilly Garlic for the church fundraiser. And I’m pretty sure they sold out!

A square photo from above the jar of picked garlic. The garlic in in the brine and there are four cloves visible. There is a bottle of dos exis in the bottom of the left hand corner of the photo, the lid to the jar is in the middle of the top of the photo and there is a silver relish fork to the right of the jar.

So obviously Pickled Garlic tastes like pickles and garlic. The harsh flavor of raw garlic disappears completely and your left with a mellow garlic flavor that is addictive and delicious.

Pickled Garlic is perfect on your next relish tray, veggie platter, or charcuterie board. My preferred method of consumption, however, is straight from the jar.

By the way, there are many ways to peel garlic, but this method looks pretty genius.

Save this Pickled Garlic Recipe to your “Pantry” Pinterest board!

And let’s be friends on Pinterest! I’m always pinning tasty recipes!

A square photo of a canning jar of picked garlic. The garlic is in the brine surrounded by dill and chili flakes. There is a bottle of dos exis in the background along with a white bowl, and the jar's lid is to the right of the jar. There is a silver relish fork to the right of the jar.
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Pickled Garlic Recipe

If you love pickles and you love garlic, you just found a tasty new best friend. This Pickled Garlic Recipe also makes a great starter canning project! 

Servings 4 pints
Calories 46 kcal

Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup canning salt
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 2 1/2 cups white vinegar
  • 2 pounds fresh garlic, peeled
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
  • 4 heads fresh dill

Instructions

  1. Combine canning salt, water, and vinegar in a large saucepan. Bring to boil; reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes (180 degrees).

  2. Meanwhile, pack garlic in to 4 sterilized pint jars (about 8 ounces per jar) leaving 1/2-inch of headspace. Add 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes and 1 head of dill to each jar. 

  3. Using a ladle, divide hot pickling liquid between the 4 jars, leaving 1/2-inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles, clean jar rims, center lids on jars, and adjust band to fingertip-tight. 

  4. Process jars in boiling water for 10 minutes. The jars must be covered by at least 1 inch of water. Turn off heat and remove cover. Let jars cool 5 minutes. Cool 12 hours. Check seals. 

Recipe Notes

This is my mother-in-law's recipe which aligns very closely with the Dilly Beans recipe in the Ball Blue Book's Guide to Preserving.


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If you love pickles and you love garlic, you just found a tasty new best friend. This Pickled Garlic Recipe also makes a great starter canning project!

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2 comments

  1. Too bad we don’t live closer. I’ve got 20 quarts of organic dilly beans.  I’ll have to try this on a pint. 

    One note, if you can stand it, let them sit for 3-5 weeks to mature and achieve their full flavor. 

  2. looks great!! we used to make our own half sour pickles at my coffee shops! It was awesome cause we got MASSIVE pickles, I mean huge buggers, from a local farm and pickles them whole in buckets. Love garlic so I bet these are right up my ally

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