Learn how to make Pickled Beets to add to salads, sandwiches, or charcuterie boards. The best part? No canning equipment is required for this easy homemade pickle recipe.

Four jars of pickled beets.

In addition to calling for zero canning experience or special canning tools, my easy refrigerator Pickled Beets recipe is remarkably versatile! My favorite options for how to use Pickled Beets? As a topping for these cookout MVP Pork Burgers with Feta Mustard, sliced and sprinkled into salads, or featured as part of a charcuterie board.

Crunchy, briny, and earthy, you’re sure to dig these Pickled Beets.

Table of Contents
  1. Recipe ingredients
  2. Ingredient notes
  3. Step-by-step instructions
  4. Recipe tips and variations
  5. Recipe FAQs
  6. Pickled Beets Recipe

Recipe ingredients

Labeled ingredients for pickled beets.

At a Glance: Here is a quick snapshot of what ingredients are in this recipe.
Please see the recipe card below for specific quantities.

Ingredient notes

  • Beets: This pickling method works with any kind of beet (red, golden, or candy cane-striped beets). I like golden beets because they don’t stain surfaces and hands the way red beets do. If you are pickling different kinds of beets at the same time, roast them in separate pans and brine them separately. Otherwise, the juices from the red beets will bleed into the golden beets and change the color.
  • Ginger, anise, and peppercorns: We preferred the taste of 1 tablespoon each of ginger, anise, and peppercorns to flavor the beets. But, it’s fine to substitute 3 tablespoons of store-bought pickling spice.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Scrub beets well under cold water and pat dry. Place in a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish and cover with parchment paper. Bake until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 45 to 60 minutes.
Beets in a roasting pan.
  1. Remove from oven, remove beets to another dish, and immediately cover with plastic wrap. Allow beets to steam for 15 to 20 minutes, to loosen skins.
Beets in a pan covered in plastic wrap.
  1. Rub off skins with fingertips or paper towels.
Beets on a plate.
  1. Slice into 1/4-inch thin rounds or crinkle-cut on a mandolin.
Beets being sliced on a mandoline slicer.
  1. In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, combine vinegar, water, sugar, and salt. In a piece of cheesecloth, bundle together the ginger, star anise, and peppercorns. Secure with a piece of kitchen twine, and add to vinegar mixture. Bring mixture to a boil, and add beets. Return to a boil. Remove from heat and discard sachet.
A cheesecloth sack sitting in a yellow liquid in a saucepan.
  1. With a slotted spoon, transfer sliced beets to jars with tight-fitting lids.
Four jars of pickled beets.
  1. Carefully spoon or pour hot brine over beets, leaving 1/2-inch of headspace. Cover, and refrigerate for 1 week. Pickled beets can be refrigerated up to 6 weeks.
Four jars of pickled beets.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: My homemade Pickled Beet recipe makes eight 1/2-cup servings. You’ll use more like 1/4-cup as a sandwich condiment, but ½ cup chopped or sliced is stellar as part of a salad.
  • Storage: Store pickled beets in the refrigerator for up to 6 weeks. Canned beets can be stored for up to 1 year in a cool, dark place (see instructions in the next section).
  • Canning: To process the pickled beets for long-term storage:
    1. Divide hot beets and pickling liquid among sterilized pint jars, leaving ½ inch headspace at the top. The beets should be fully submerged in liquid.
    2. Stir the contents to release any air bubbles, wipe the rim of each jar clean, and add the lids and screw bands until finger-tight (do not completely tighten them or air cannot escape).
    3. Process in boiling water (covered by at least 1 inch of water, and start the clock when the water is rapidly boiling) according to your elevation: 30 minutes for up to 1,000 feet, 35 minutes for 1,001 to 3,000 feet, 40 minutes for 3,001 to 6,000 feet, and 45 minutes for over 6,000 feet.
    4. Cool on a wire rack for 24 hours (the lids should pop as they cool and seal). Store in cool, dark place for up to 1 year.
A pork burger with a side of curly fries.
Pork Burgers with Pickled Beets and a side of Curly Fries.

Recipe FAQs

How do you pick out good beets?

Select beets that are firm and hard, not squishy. Avoid any beets that have soft spots or are wrinkled. If available, seek out beets that have their greens still attached.

How do you trim and wash beets?

Trim the beet greens off about 2 inches above the root. If you get too close, the beets will bleed. If you leave too much, the stem will continue to pull moisture out of the beets. To wash beets, scrub them vigorously under running water to remove any dirt.

Can you eat beet greens?

You can eat beet greens raw or cooked. Use beet greens in place of Swiss chard or spinach in soups or salads, try a handful to replace some of the basil in pesto, or blend into your next green smoothie. Aim to use beet greens within 1 to 2 days.

What is the best way to store raw beets?

Keep raw, unwashed beets in the refrigerator for up to 10 days. Store loose in your crisper drawer or in a plastic bag with holes cut in it for humidity circulation.

Pork Burgers with Feta Mustard

Spiced Pork Burgers topped with a feta-mustard mayonnaise and pickled beets! An amazing flavor combination and hand’s down my favorite burger of all time. You’re going to think I’m crazy, but this is the best…

30 minutes
View Recipe

More DIY food projects

Pickles

Pickled beets in two mason jars.

Pickled Beets

Learn how to make Pickled Beets to add to salads, sandwiches, or charcuterie boards. The best part? No canning equipment is required for this easy homemade pickle recipe.
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 1 hr 10 mins
Chilling Time 3 d
Total Time 1 hr 15 mins
Servings 8 servings (½ cup each)
Course Side Dish
Cuisine American
Calories 231

Ingredients 

  • 3 pounds beets trimmed, scrubbed, and unpeeled (see note 1)
  • 2 cups white vinegar
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger peeled and cut into 1/4-inch rounds (see note 2)
  • 1 pod star anise
  • 1/2 teaspoon whole black peppercorns

Instructions 

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Scrub beets well under cold water and pat dry. Place in a 9-inch by 13-inch baking dish and cover with parchment paper. Bake until tender when pierced with a skewer, about 45 to 60 minutes.
  • Remove from oven, remove beets to another dish, and immediately cover with plastic wrap. Allow beets to steam for 15 to 20 minutes, to loosen skins.
  • Rub off skins with fingertips or paper towels. Slice into 1/4-inch thin rounds or crinkle-cut on a mandolin.
  • In a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat, combine vinegar, water, sugar, and salt. In a piece of cheesecloth, bundle together the ginger, star anise, and peppercorns. Secure with a piece of kitchen twine, and add to vinegar mixture. Bring mixture to a boil, and add beets. Return to a boil. Remove from heat and discard sachet.
  • With a slotted spoon, transfer sliced beets to jars with tight-fitting lids. Carefully spoon or pour hot brine over beets, leaving 1/2-inch of headspace. Cover, and refrigerate for 1 week. Pickles can be refrigerated up to 6 weeks.

Notes

  1. Beets: This pickling method works with any kind of beet (red, golden, or candy cane-striped beets). I like golden beets because they don’t stain surfaces and hands the way red beets do. If you are pickling different kinds of beets at the same time, roast them in separate pans and brine them separately. Otherwise, the juices from the red beets will bleed into the golden beets and change the color.
  2. Ginger, anise, and peppercorns: We preferred the taste of 1 tablespoon each of ginger, anise, and peppercorns to flavor the beets. But, it’s fine to substitute 3 tablespoons of store-bought pickling spice.
  3. Yield: My homemade Pickled Beet recipe makes eight 1/2-cup servings. You’ll use more like 1/4-cup as a sandwich condiment, but ½ cup chopped or sliced is stellar as part of a salad.
  4. Storage: Store pickled beets in the refrigerator for up to 6 weeks. Canned beets can be stored for up to 1 year in a cool, dark place (see instructions in the next section).
  5. Canning: To process the pickled beets for long-term storage:
    1. Divide hot beets and pickling liquid among sterilized pint jars, leaving ½ inch headspace at the top. The beets should be fully submerged in liquid.
    2. Stir the contents to release any air bubbles, wipe the rim of each jar clean, and add the lids and screw bands until finger-tight (do not completely tighten them or air cannot escape).
    3. Process in boiling water (covered by at least 1 inch of water, and start the clock when the water is rapidly boiling) according to your elevation: 30 minutes for up to 1,000 feet, 35 minutes for 1,001 to 3,000 feet, 40 minutes for 3,001 to 6,000 feet, and 45 minutes for over 6,000 feet.
    4. Cool on a wire rack for 24 hours (the lids should pop as they cool and seal). Store in cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

Nutrition

Serving: 0.5cupCalories: 231kcalCarbohydrates: 54gProtein: 3gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 427mgPotassium: 561mgFiber: 5gSugar: 49gVitamin A: 58IUVitamin C: 8mgCalcium: 35mgIron: 1mg
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Comments

  1. Pickled Beets. Three pounds is not 454g its 1.4 kg (rounded). Pickled Beets were a staple in UK in 1950s & 60s but vanished as Chefs developed other ways of using beets. I’m looking forward to try this.
    Best wishes from Thailand.
    Paul