Not too sweet and perfectly spiced, there’s no better summer dessert than a warm peach cobbler, fresh out of the oven, with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. No need to grab a box of cake mix, because this made-from-scratch recipe comes together in a flash and bakes up into fluffy, golden brown perfection. This summer, life’s a peach!

If you love cobblers as much as I do, you’ll definitely want to try my blueberry cobbler, blackberry cobbler, or my apple walnut cobbler.

Not too sweet and perfectly spiced, there’s no better summer dessert than a warm peach cobbler, fresh out of the oven, with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. No need to grab a box of cake mix, because this made-from-scratch recipe comes together in a flash and bakes up into fluffy, golden brown perfection. This summer, life’s a peach!

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Need to make a summer peach cobbler for two, or for an army? Click and slide the number next to ‘servings’ on the recipe card below to adjust the ingredients to match how many you’re feeding—the recipe does the math for you, it’s that easy.

What is Peach Cobbler?

A traditional cobbler is a dessert using fresh fruit, in this case peaches, with a biscuit-like dough that is dropped by the spoonful onto the fruit and baked. When it was invented, it’s likely that it looked like a bumpy cobble brick road, earning the name cobbler.

How does a cobbler compare to a crisp?

Pies, crisps, buckles, cobblers, and crumbles all are made by baking fruit with some kind of dough. These desserts can vary depending on the region, much like the dialect of a language. In general, crisps rely on a crumbly, streusel type topping that can contain oats, while cobblers are more biscuity and fluffy.

How do you make Peach Cobbler from scratch?

First, peaches are quickly blanched and peeled, then sliced and mixed with sugar, spices, and a little cornstarch. The topping is made by cutting together butter, flour, sugar, salt, and baking powder until it looks like coarse meal. Finally, milk is stirred in to make a batter that is spooned over the fruit mixture and then baked.

Do you have to peel the peaches for Peach Cobbler?

While it’s not mandatory to peel the peaches, you may want to give them a good scrub to get as much of the fuzz off as you can.

Here’s how to do it:

A collage of 4 pictures showing how to peel peaches.

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Can you use frozen peaches to make Peach Cobbler?

In the summer when gorgeous peaches are in season, I buy half a bushel, and slice them up and freeze them to make cobbler all winter long. You can bake this recipe without thawing the frozen fruit, but you may need a little extra baking time if you do.

Can you use canned peaches to make Peach Cobbler?

If you prefer, you can use canned, drained peaches in this recipe in place of fresh.

What can you use instead of a pastry blender?

If you don’t have a pastry blender, you can use two knives for cutting the ingredients together. If you’d like to get a pastry cutter, I like this one (Culinary Hill may earn money if you buy through this link).

Can you make Peach Cobbler without sugar?

If you’re trying to limit your sugar intake, you can make sugar-free peach cobbler by switching out your favorite bake-able sugar substitute.

Not too sweet and perfectly spiced, there’s no better summer dessert than a warm peach cobbler, fresh out of the oven, with a scoop of vanilla bean ice cream. No need to grab a box of cake mix, because this made-from-scratch recipe comes together in a flash and bakes up into fluffy, golden brown perfection. This summer, life’s a peach!

Can Peach Cobbler be frozen?

Leavened doughs, such as the biscuit-like topping used on traditional cobblers, need to be be baked before you freeze them. Freezer storage can interrupt the chemical processes that make a cobbler light and fluffy.

Does Peach Cobbler need to be refrigerated?

After you bake the cobbler and serve it, it should be fine left out that day. If you have any cobbler left over afterwards, you can store it in the refrigerator after serving and reheat as needed.

Can you make Peach Cobbler in a dutch oven or cast iron skillet?

Instead of a casserole, you can use your favorite cast iron skillet or Dutch oven for this recipe, but you might want to butter the skillet before adding the peaches.You can also break this cobbler up into mini, individual servings and bake using buttered, oven-safe ramekins.

Can you make Peach Cobbler in a crock pot or slow cooker?

In case oven space is an issue, you can try making this in a crock pot, but you may need to invert the batter, putting it at the bottom of the crock pot, so it can cook. Let me know how it goes!

Drop dough onto bottom of a 5-quart slow cooker coated with butter. Spoon the peaches over batter.

Cook, covered, on high until peaches are bubbly, 1-¾ to 2 hours.

How do you keep peaches from turning brown?

In case you’ve already sliced the peached, but need to put things on hold, don’t fret. To prevent peaches from turning brown, add some lemon juice to them.

A plate of peach cobbler with vanilla ice cream.

Peach Cobbler

There's no better summer dessert than a warm Peach Cobbler, fresh from the oven, with a scoop of ice cream. This from-scratch recipe is ready to bake with just 10 minutes of prep and you'll love the golden brown topping with bubbly peaches beneath.
5 from 3 votes
Prep Time 20 mins
Cook Time 55 mins
Cooling time 30 mins
Total Time 1 hr 15 mins
Servings 6 servings (1 cup each)
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Calories 386

Ingredients 

For the filling:

  • 3 pounds fresh peaches peeled and sliced (about 4 cups, see note 1)
  • 1/3 cup orange juice
  • 3 tablespoons granulated sugar

For the topping:

  • 2/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1/4 teaspoon baking powder
  • pinch Salt
  • 1/2 cup butter softened (see note 2)
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Vanilla ice cream for serving, optional (see note 3)

Instructions 

  • Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In a medium bowl, add peaches, orange juice, and sugar, and stir to combine, then pour into a 9-inch square or round baking dish.
  • In a small bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, and salt. In a medium bowl, cream butter and sugar together until pale and fluffy, about 5 minutes.
  • Beat in egg and vanilla extract. Working in batches, add ⅓ of the flour mixture at a time, beating well after each addition.
  • Drop rounded tablespoons of batter over the peach mixture (I like to use the OXO small scoop, a #70 portion scoop, heaped).
  • Bake until the topping is golden brown and the filling is hot and bubbly, about 35 to 40 minutes. Cool 10 minutes before serving. Serve with ice cream if desired.

Notes

  1. Peaches: To peel the peaches, bring a large pot of water to boil. Set a large bowl of ice water nearby. Score the blossom end (bottom) of each peach with an X. Submerge the peaches in boiling water just until the skins pull back and wrinkle, about 30 to 40 seconds. Plunge into an ice bath to stop the cooking. Once the peaches have cooled, you should easily be able to remove the skin.
  2. Butter: To soften butter in the microwave, cut each stick of butter in half, unwrap, and place on a microwave-safe plate. Then cook the butter at 10% power for 1 minute. Gently press on the butter with your finger, and if it still feels too firm, cook for another 40 seconds at 10% power.
  3. Vanilla ice cream: Store-bought or homemade; either is a treat. Whipped cream would also be dreamy.
  4. Yield: This recipe makes about 6 cups of Peach Cobbler, enough for 6 (1-cup) servings.
  5. Storage: Leftover cobbler is safe covered at room temperature the same day you bake it. Beyond that, store covered in the refrigerator for up to 3 more days. Reheat if desired before serving.
  6. Freezer: Bake the cobbler according to the recipe, then cool completely, wrap in freeze-safe plastic wrap or foil, and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw overnight in the refrigerator and reheat before serving.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cupCalories: 386kcalCarbohydrates: 58gProtein: 5gFat: 17gSaturated Fat: 10gPolyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 4gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 68mgSodium: 180mgPotassium: 335mgFiber: 4gSugar: 43gVitamin A: 1279IUVitamin C: 16mgCalcium: 31mgIron: 2mg
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