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These classic Oatmeal Raisin cookies are soft, chewy, and so delicious. And the recipe is a cinch! Not a raisin fan? I have tons of variations below, so try the one that sounds good.

A platter of oatmeal raisin cookies.

Raisins, like mushrooms and cilantro, are a polarizing food. When it comes to Oatmeal Cookies, people seem to either adore the raisins or despise them.

I’m firmly on Team Raisin because of the added sweetness and texture. Chocolate chips are fine, but it’s just not the same here (add them anywhere else though!).

I love the sight and the smell of Oatmeal Raisin Cookies, and nothing takes me quite back to childhood like these do.

Table of Contents
  1. Recipe ingredients
  2. Ingredient notes
  3. Step-by-step instructions
  4. Recipe tips and variations
  5. Recipe FAQs
  6. Oatmeal Raisin Cookies Recipe

Recipe ingredients

Labeled ingredients for oatmeal raisin cookies.

At a Glance: Here is a quick snapshot of what ingredients are in this recipe.
Please see the recipe card below for specific quantities.

Ingredient notes

  • Cinnamon and nutmeg: Cinnamon is almost always in these cookies, but I also add freshly grated nutmeg as an extra secret ingredient.
  • Butter: Cold butter usually softens up in about 30 minutes when left out at room temperature (much longer if frozen). To soften butter in the microwave, cut each stick of butter in half, unwrap, and place on a microwave-safe plate. Then cook the butter at 10% power (that’s ten percent!) for 1 minute. Afterward, gently press on the butter with your finger. If still too firm, cook for another 40 seconds at 10% power.
  • Rolled oats: Old-fashioned whole rolled oats are flattened and round in appearance. Instant (quick oats) can be used too, but the cookie will be less chewy. Don’t use steel cut oats (also known as Scottish or Irish oats).
  • Raisins: If your raisins are dried out, plump them up by soaking them in some warm water before adding them to the dough. Pat dry with a paper towel after soaking. If you’re not a fan of raisins, you can also use dried cranberries, currants, nuts, or chocolate chips instead.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Adjust oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone mats. In a medium bowl or on a piece of parchment paper, sift together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside.
Sifting flour on to parchment paper.
  1. In a standing mixer fit with the paddle attachment, or with an electric mixer on high speed, cream butter until pale and fluffy.
Creaming butter and sugar together in a bowl.
  1. Add the granulated and brown sugars and beat until the mixture is smooth. Add egg and vanilla and beat on low speed until blended, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.
Cookie dough in a mixing bowl.
  1. Add the flour mixture in batches (about ¼ cup at a time) and mix on low speed until just blended. Add the oats and raisins and stir until just combined.
Oatmeal raisin cookie dough in a mixing bowl.
  1. Working with 1 heaping tablespoon of dough at a time, scoop dough into 1 1/2-inch balls and drop on prepared baking sheets about 2 inches apart. (I use the OXO medium cookie scoop, a size 40 portioner, and do 12 scoops of dough per baking sheet). You should have 24 cookies.
Oatmeal raisin cookie dough on a baking sheet.
  1. Bake until the cookies are golden brown, about 12-15 minutes. Transfer to wire racks and cool completely.
Oatmeal raisin cookies on a baking sheet.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: This recipe makes 24 cookies, but you can make more or less depending on the size of the dough balls. Just be sure to adjust your baking time if you do.
  • Storage: Store leftovers in an airtight container for up to 1 week.
  • Freezer: Portion out the cookie dough into balls and freeze to bake later. Bake them straight from the oven at 350 degrees for 13 to 16 minutes.
  • More mix-ins: Try ½ cup of chocolate chips, butterscotch chips, toasted walnuts, toasted pecans, dried cranberries, or flaked coconut.
A platter of oatmeal raisin cookies.

Recipe FAQs

How do you roll sticky cookie dough?

Having wet hands makes it easier to handle cookie dough. You can also chill the dough in the refrigerator for 20 minutes.

Oatmeal Scotchies

These easy Oatmeal Scotchies are soft, chewy, and dotted with butterscotch chips. This cookie recipe is easy to make, hard to resist, and impossible not to love.

25 minutes
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More classic cookies

A pile of oatmeal raisin cookies on a marble plattter.

Oatmeal Raisin Cookies

These classic Oatmeal Raisin cookies are soft, chewy, and so delicious. And the recipe is a cinch!
5 from 2 votes
Prep Time 15 mins
Cook Time 15 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Servings 24 cookies
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Calories 113

Ingredients 

Instructions 

  • Adjust oven racks to the upper-middle and lower-middle positions. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper or silicone mats.
  • In a medium bowl or on a piece of parchment paper, sift together flour, baking soda, cinnamon, nutmeg, and salt. Set aside.
  • In a standing mixer fit with the paddle attachment, or with an electric mixer on high speed, cream butter until pale and fluffy. Add the granulated and brown sugars and beat until the mixture is smooth.
  • Add egg and vanilla and beat on low speed until blended, scraping down the sides of the bowl as necessary.
  • Add the flour mixture in batches (about ¼ cup at a time) and mix on low speed until just blended. Add the oats and raisins and stir until just combined.
  • Working with 1 heaping tablespoon of dough at a time, scoop dough into 1 1/2-inch balls and drop on prepared baking sheets about 2 inches apart. (I use the OXO medium cookie scoop, a size 40 portioner, and do 12 scoops of dough per baking sheet). You should have 24 cookies.
  • Bake until the cookies are golden brown, about 12-15 minutes. Transfer to wire racks and cool completely.

Notes

  1. Cinnamon and nutmeg: Cinnamon is almost always in these cookies, but I also add freshly grated nutmeg as an extra secret ingredient.
  2. Butter: Cold butter usually softens up in about 30 minutes when left out at room temperature (much longer if frozen). To soften butter in the microwave, cut each stick of butter in half, unwrap, and place on a microwave-safe plate. Then cook the butter at 10% power (that’s ten percent!) for 1 minute. Afterward, gently press on the butter with your finger. If still too firm, cook for another 40 seconds at 10% power.
  3. Rolled oats: Old-fashioned whole rolled oats are flattened and round in appearance. Instant (quick oats) can be used too, but the cookie will be less chewy. Don’t use steel cut oats (also known as Scottish or Irish oats).
  4. Raisins: If your raisins are dried out, plump them up by soaking them in some warm water before adding them to the dough. Pat dry with a paper towel after soaking. If you’re not a fan of raisins, you can also use dried cranberries, currants, nuts, or chocolate chips instead.
  5. Yield: This recipe makes 24 cookies, but you can make more or less depending on the size of the dough balls. Just be sure to adjust your baking time if you do.
  6. Storage: Store leftovers in an airtight container for up to 1 week.
  7. Freezer: Portion out the cookie dough into balls and freeze to bake later. Bake them straight from the oven at 350 degrees for 13 to 16 minutes.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cookieCalories: 113kcalCarbohydrates: 17gProtein: 1gFat: 4gSaturated Fat: 3gPolyunsaturated Fat: 0.3gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gTrans Fat: 0.2gCholesterol: 18mgSodium: 72mgPotassium: 58mgFiber: 1gSugar: 9gVitamin A: 130IUVitamin C: 0.2mgCalcium: 10mgIron: 1mg
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Executive Chef and CEO at | Website | + posts

Meggan Hill is the Executive Chef and CEO of Culinary Hill, a popular digital publication in the food space. She loves to combine her Midwestern food memories with her culinary school education to create her own delicious take on modern family fare. Millions of readers visit Culinary Hill each month for meticulously-tested recipes as well as skills and tricks for ingredient prep, cooking ahead, menu planning, and entertaining. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the iCUE Culinary Arts program at College of the Canyons.

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Comments

  1. I made these cookies last night. The end result was more like β€œTATE” flat and crunchy style. The flavor was great but I wonder if the flour amount is wrong since you say to add in 1 cup at a time and recipe only calls for 3/4 cup.