Make this copycat Montreal Steak Seasoning with 8 basic spices, then season steak (of course), chicken, pork, and vegetables. Or, mix with oil and soy sauce for a delicious marinade!

A plate with Montreal Steak Seasoning ingredients before mixing.
Table of Contents
  1. Ingredient notes
  2. Instructions
  3. Recipe tips and variations
  4. Montreal Steak Seasoning Recipe

Ingredient notes

  • Dill: Montreal Steak Seasoning uses dill seed, but you can substitute 1 tablespoon dill weed if desired.

Instructions

  • In a small bowl, combine paprika, pepper, salt, garlic, onion, coriander, dill, and crushed red pepper. Store in an airtight container.
A jar of homemade Montreal Steak Seasoning.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: This recipe makes ¾ cup seasoning (you’ll need an 8 ounce jar to store it).
  • Storage: Store this spice blend covered in the pantry for up to 6 months.
  • Marinade: To make a marinade for 2 pounds of steak, chicken, or pork, whisk together ½ cup olive oil, ¼ cup soy sauce, and 4 teaspoons seasoning. Marinade at room temperature for 30 minutes or in the refrigerator for up to 1 hour. Pat meat dry before cooking.
  • Origin: Montreal Steak Seasoning is based on the pickling spices of Eastern European and Jewish cuisine. The spice blend also goes by the names Montreal Steak Spice, Canadian Steak Spice, and Canadian Steak Seasoning.

More DIY spice blends

A plate with Montreal Steak Seasoning ingredients before mixing.

Montreal Steak Seasoning

Make this copycat Montreal Steak Seasoning with 8 basic spices, then season steak (of course), chicken, pork, and vegetables. Or, mix with oil and soy sauce for a delicious marinade!
5 from 35 votes
Prep Time 1 min
Cook Time 1 min
Total Time 2 mins
Servings 36 servings (1 tsp each)
Course Pantry
Cuisine Canadian
Calories 6

Ingredients 

  • 2 tablespoons whole black peppercorns crushed
  • 2 tablespoons garlic powder
  • 2 tablespoons kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons paprika
  • 1 tablespoon onion powder
  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander
  • 1 tablespoon dill seed or dill weed (see note 1)
  • 1 tablespoon crushed red pepper flakes

Instructions 

  • In a small bowl, combine paprika, pepper, salt, garlic, onion, coriander, dill, and crushed red pepper. Store in an airtight container.

Notes

  1. Dill: Montreal Steak Seasoning uses dill seed, but you can substitute 1 tablespoon dill weed if desired.
  2. Yield: This recipe makes ¾ cup seasoning (you’ll need an 8 ounce jar to store it).
  3. Storage: Store this spice blend covered in the pantry for up to 6 months.
  4. Marinade: To make a marinade for 2 pounds of steak, chicken, or pork, whisk together ½ cup olive oil, ¼ cup soy sauce, and 4 teaspoons seasoning. Marinade at room temperature for 30 minutes or in the refrigerator for up to 1 hour. Pat meat dry before cooking.
  5. Origin: Montreal Steak Seasoning is based on the pickling spices of Eastern European and Jewish cuisine. The spice blend also goes by the names Montreal Steak Spice, Canadian Steak Spice, and Canadian Steak Seasoning.

Nutrition

Serving: 1teaspoonCalories: 6kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 1gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 392mgPotassium: 32mgFiber: 1gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 261IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 9mgIron: 1mg
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Meggan Hill

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Comments

  1. Tried this recipe when I ran out of Montreal Steak seasoning for my chili recipe. I was skeptical, and after following the recipe exactly, it didn’t smell at all like the real thing. After adding it to the beef, it still didn’t smell right. 5 minutes later I lifted the lid of the pot: there it was, that awesome aroma! I’ll never buy the real stuff again, THANK YOU!5 stars

  2. I used this to make the “Lightened-Up Philly Cheese Steak Mac and Cheese Bake” on Pillsbury.com and it was amazing! I used more of this than the recipe called for because it was that good (and I like extra seasoning). I put all my excess into an old empty spice jar so I can have it on hand.5 stars

  3. Hi Meggan,
    Thanks for this recipe. It is great.
    But, a couple of points.
    First, concerning your statement about using salt just before cooking. Dry brining is the technique of salting well (hours or even a day) ahead, wrapping in plastic wrap and putting the meat back in the fridge. The salt draws moisture out of the meat, as you correctly state, but then the salt mixes with the moisture and is drawn back into the meat where is is both more effective in enhancing the taste and also in tenderizing the meat. Samin Nosrat discusses this in her book, “Salt Fat Acid Heat”, as does Meathead Goldwyn in his Amazingribs.com website. If you do this, you may want to make a batch of seasoning and omit the salt. I like to use strong, black coffee to make a paste.
    Second, Since cold meat takes up smoke better than warm meat, if you are grilling or smoking the meat, take it straight from the fridge to the cooker.

    1. Thanks for this! I am going to get that book you mentioned, I always look at it on Amazon and wonder if I should get it. I clearly have more to learn, so I will. I appreciate your help so much. Thanks a lot! -Meggan

    2. Correct about dry brining. But surprised you wrap it in plastic wrap. I dry brine the steaks in the fridge, exposed on a rack, to allow the air to circulate around the meat (I’ve read that that is critical). My steaks are always super juicy and flavourful. I just puts a couple of steaks into the fridge with this mix. Looking forward to trying them tomorrow!

  4. Why is this recipe classed as american cuisine when it originated in Montréal, Québec, Canada?

    1. Hi Dale, because no one was paying attention. We fell asleep at the wheel. I’m sorry about that, you’re obviously right, and I fixed it. Sorry again. I also had dill weed listed in the recipe and it’s supposed to be dill seed. -Meggan

    2. meggan, You mention it is supposed to be dill seed but the recipe still says dill weed and the picture looks like dill weed. Which is it?

      I used this on some steaks last night and it was very good. I wanted smaller red pepper flakes so I blended it and it turned more into a rub, but was delicious. I used the dill weed as mentioned in the recipe

    3. Hi Craig! I’m glad you enjoyed it! Originally it was dill weed, but a reader pointed out it should be dill seed. I’ve updated it so it can be either, sorry about that! – Meggan

  5. perfect, thank you. they quit selling the large containers in my local store and the small ones run out too soon.5 stars

  6. Very good recipe. A note: Montreal Seasoning calls for “dill,” but it is the seed you want as opposed to “dill weed” as shown in your photo. I ended up using dill weed myself as I was out of dill seed, which is still very good. Just mentioning that the dill seed is what you get when you buy Montreal Seasoning at the store.5 stars

    1. Hi Timothy, that is SO HELPFUL. Thank you. I will fix it up for sure! I appreciate your help. -Meggan

  7. This is s very good seasoning. Rich in flavor, and a welcomed bit out of the ordinary because of the use of dill  and coriander with beef,  It works very well. I recommend the use is smoked paprika instead of the pretty-but-tasteless paprika used for garnishing. This recipe has become part of my permanent collection. Well worth trying if you haven’t yet. 5 stars

  8. This is great! We were going on vacation and I didn’t want to pack a bunch of seasonings, so I was searching for something that would have everything I needed in one jar. This is it! Great on steaks, burgers, even grilled chicken! It is just like the store brand Montreal Steak Seasoning!5 stars