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Roasting garlic is easy! All you need is an oven, some foil, and a drizzle of olive oil. Stir it into soups, mash it into potatoes, or mix it into soft butter to slather on bread.

An easy recipe for how to roast garlic in the oven. Mash roasted garlic cloves and add to potatoes, soups, and salad dressings or spread directly on bread.

This simple oven method works for individually peeled cloves or whole bulbs. In fact, if you’re blessed with a bumper crop of garlic, you can roast the bulbs in bulk and freeze it to enjoy year round.

Unlike raw garlic, which has a sharpness some people can’t tolerate in large amounts, roasted garlic is mellow but still deeply flavorful. You might even find yourself eating a few cloves all by themselves.

Recipe ingredients:

Ingredients for roasted garlic.

Step-by-step instructions:

  1. First, set the oven to 400 degrees. Then remove the papery outer layer of the bulb (but not the papery skins). Keep the cloves attached.
    An easy recipe for how to roast garlic in the oven. Mash roasted garlic cloves and add to potatoes, soups, and salad dressings or spread directly on bread.
  2. Next, slice off the top layer of the bulb to expose the cloves. Drizzle with oil, then wrap the bulb in foil, individually or as a group.
    A bulb of garlic with the top trimmed off and drizzled with olive oil.
  3. Last, roast until the cloves are a deep golden color and soft as butter, 30 to 40 minutes. Once the bulbs are cool enough to handle, you can squeeze out the individual cloves and eat them straight or mash them to use in other recipes.

Recipe tips and variations:

  • Large quantities: Arrange individual bulbs of garlic in a muffin tin or baking dish, drizzle them with oil, and cover with foil to roast.
  • Longer roasting= deeper flavor: The longer you roast the garlic, the darker and deeper it gets.
  • Freezing roasted garlic: You can freeze whole cloves individually on a plate or baking sheet. Once frozen solid, transfer to a freezer-safe bag or container. Or, mash the roasted garlic and portion it out into teaspoons or tablespoons, or even pack it in an ice cube tray and make little cubes of roasted garlic. These little frozen portions can also be transferred to a freezer-safe plastic bag or other container. Thaw as needed.
  • Ways to use it: Mix it into stone ground mustard or mayo and spread it on a sandwich. Add whole cloves to a fruit and cheese board. Rub a roasted garlic paste under the skin of a chicken before roasting. Stir it into a soup or add to your mashed potatoes.

Great recipes for roasted garlic:

Bulbs of roasted garlic on foil.

How to Roast Garlic

Learn how to Roast Garlic with just foil and a drizzle of olive oil (or make it in on the stove). Stir mellow roasted garlic into soups, mash it into potatoes, or mix it into soft butter to slather on bread.
5 from 5 votes
Prep Time 5 mins
Cook Time 30 mins
Total Time 35 mins
Servings 6 servings (2 cloves each)
Course Appetizer
Cuisine American
Calories 21

Ingredients 

Instructions 

To roast whole garlic bulbs:

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Remove outer papery layers of garlic bulb, leaving the skins in tact and cloves attached.
  • Using a sharp knife, trim about ¼ inch to a ½ inch off the top of the bulb to expose the cloves. Drizzle with olive oil (I like about 2 tablespoons olive oil per head of garlic). 
  • Wrap the individual heads of garlic tightly in foil and place on a baking sheet. Or, place the individual heads in a muffin tin and wrap tightly in foil.
  • Roast for 30 to 60 minutes depending on your preference, checking the cloves at 30 minutes. The roasted garlic is done when it caramelized in color and the cloves are very soft and can be pieced easily with a knife.

To roast peeled individual garlic cloves:

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a small baking dish or pie plate with foil. Arrange peeled garlic cloves in the middle of the foil and drizzle completely with olive oil. 
  • Wrap the foil tightly to make a packet and roast 30 to 40 minutes, until golden in color and completely softened.

To roasted unpeeled individual garlic cloves:

  • In a dry medium skillet over medium-low heat, toast garlic cloves until spotty, dark brown, and slightly softened, about 20 to 25 minutes. Remove pan from heat, cover, and let stand until garlic is completely soft, 10 to 15 minutes.

Recipe Video

Notes

  1. Garlic: There are two main types of garlic: softneck and hardneck. Softneck garlic is common at grocery stores and has thin papery skins and small cloves. It's harder to peel but has an extremely long shelf life (up to 8 months). Hardneck garlic is stronger in flavor and has larger cloves, and it produces a scape (a strong stem rising out of the bulb) which is visible if you cut a cross-section through the bulb. The shelf-life is shorter, 3 to 5 months after harvest.
  2. Yield: 1 bulb of garlic has about 10-12 cloves garlic per bulb, but your results may vary and your yield depends on how many bulbs and/or cloves you start with.
  3. Storage: Store roasted garlic cloves in an airtight container in the refrigerator, completely submerged in oil, for up to 4 days.
  4. Freezer: Freeze whole cloves individually on a plate or baking sheet until solid. Or, mash the roasted garlic and portion it into teaspoons or tablespoons, or pack it in an ice cube tray and make tiny cubes of roasted garlic. Transfer the individual cloves or frozen portions to a freezer-safe container, then label, date, and freeze for up to 3 months. Thaw as needed.

Nutrition

Serving: 2clovesCalories: 21kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 1gFat: 2gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 1mgSugar: 1g
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Executive Chef and CEO at | Website | + posts

Meggan Hill is the Executive Chef and CEO of Culinary Hill, a popular digital publication in the food space. She loves to combine her Midwestern food memories with her culinary school education to create her own delicious take on modern family fare. Millions of readers visit Culinary Hill each month for meticulously-tested recipes as well as skills and tricks for ingredient prep, cooking ahead, menu planning, and entertaining. She graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the iCUE Culinary Arts program at College of the Canyons.

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Comments

    1. Hi Joan! YES! I need to add this info to the post. You can freeze whole cloves individually on a plate or baking sheet, then transfer to a freezer-safe bag or container. You can also mash the roasted garlic and portion it out into teaspoons or tablespoons, or even pack it in an ice cube tray and make little cubes of roasted garlic. These little frozen portions can also be transferred to a freezer-safe plastic bag or other container. I hope that helps! Thanks a lot! -Meggan

  1. good afternoon,
    Yes I do like roasting garlic and I would like to know if after I have roasted them can I freeze the leftovers that we did not eat? Cause we have a lot of garlic that we will roast? thanks again have a great afternoon.
    Sylvie

  2. I did this and I love it! My recipes that require garlic are so much richer in taste. I still use some garlic raw but oh my!! Fantastic process for garlic!!5 stars