Homemade Salted Caramel Sauce

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

Salted Caramel Sauce is positively magical.

Whether you need a drizzle of sweetness on ice cream, candy, or your morning coffee, this recipe tastes SO GOOD, you’ll want to put it on everything else, too.

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

The best way to ensure success with caramel (or most homemade candies, for that matter), is to use a thermometer. That way, you can worry less about vague indicators of doneness (color, thickness) and go with FACTS.

I use this thermometer but a standard candy thermometer will work, too.

MY LATEST RECIPES

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

Start off by bringing the water and sugar to boil. By not stirring, you’ll avoid splashing the sugar water on the sides of the pan where it will get stuck and, ultimately, wasted. Stirring also causes crystals to form and they will continue to form as the caramel cools which could lead to graininess.

Bring your sugar water to exactly 350 degrees. It will turn a dark amber color. Remove from heat immediately.

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

Whisk in part of the hot cream. It bubbles ferociously, so that’s why you only add in 1/4 cup at first. Once the bubbling settles down, add the rest of the cream, a splash of vanilla and, of course, some salt.

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

Whisk until smooth, then transfer to a bowl to cool. The sauce will thicken as it cools.

And it’s goooooood. Seriously, this stuff is insanely good. You’re going to love it.

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.

Save this Salted Caramel Sauce to your “Desserts” Pinterest board!

And let’s be friends on Pinterest! I’m always pinning tasty recipes!

An easy homemade Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.
5 from 2 votes
Print

Homemade Salted Caramel Sauce

An easy Salted Caramel Sauce perfect for drizzling on hot chocolate, cookies, candy, and ice cream! Or just eat it with a spoon.
Course Dessert
Cuisine American
Cook Time 20 minutes
Total Time 20 minutes
Servings 1 cup
Calories 136 kcal

Ingredients

  • ½ cup water
  • 1 cup sugar
  • ¾ cup heavy cream
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Instructions

  1. Pour water into a large saucepan. Add sugar to the center of the pan, keeping any sugar granules off the sides of the pan. Cover and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Do not stir.
  2. Remove cover and continue boiling until the sugar mixture is a deep amber color and reaches 350°F on a candy thermometer, about 10 to 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, heat the cream in a small saucepan over medium-low heat. If it begins to simmer, turn the heat down to low and cover to keep warm.
  4. Remove the amber-colored sugar mixture from the heat and immediately stir in ¼ cup warmed cream. When the bubbling subsides, add the remaining cream, vanilla, and salt. Whisk until smooth and cool slightly before serving warm, or cool completely and serve at room temperature. The Salted Caramel sauce will continue to thicken as it cools.

This post contains affiliate links. For more information on my Affiliate and Advertising Policy, please click here.

More recipes you'll love...

9 comments

  1. YES YES YES YES. I love caramel. I love salt. I love salted caramel. Therefore, I love this recipe. :-)

  2. There is nothing that saddens me more in cooking as when an amazing looking recipe disappoints. I have made this recipe twice now and have been disappointed twice. The flavor and smoothness is definately there, that is not in dispute, but when it cools and crystalizes its not appealing to have grainy caramel on ice cream or cakes. I know and am aware of the crystalization concepts in chocolate. But whenever I use this method for caramel (water and sugar) it turns out the same. Not my favorite and won’t make it again unless someone can explain where its failing. Sadly, it discredits the website as well. And this is one of my favorite sites. Sorry Meggan.

    • Hi Tim, I’m sorry to hear that’s happening to you. Unfortunately I lack the scientific food background to have any idea why your caramel sauce is crystalizing when cooled – this has never happened to me. It sounds like you probably know more than I do. I’ll ask one of my pastry chef friends and see if she has any ideas, but I’m sorry again for the bad experience. I completely understand if you can’t come back to the blog. I’ll comment again if I learn anything. Best of luck.

    • Hi David, just looking online quick I saw something about stirring. It’s important that you don’t stir the caramel as it’s cooking as that causes crystals to grow, and to continue to grow, as it cools. It sounds like you probably know more about this stuff than I do, but I just thought I’d mention it. If you are stirring the caramel, that might cause the graininess. Good luck.

  3. I have noticed that detail in other recipes to not stir. In this recipe I noticed a technique that I thought might have been a game changer, and that is adding the sugar into the center of the boiling water. But it didn’t. The recipe that melts sugar to amber color, stir in pads of butter, then cream seems fail proof for me so far. I still enjoy your blog. Thank you for your help on this.

    • One of my readers with a food science background is going to test this for us tomorrow. We’ll see what Dave can figure out. I also never cited my source on this recipe (correcting that now) but it’s an America’s Test Kitchen recipe. I will go look at the book again and see if I can find any other info. Thanks Tim.

  4. Works perfectly if you DO NOT stir the mixture as it cooks (google sucrose inversion).  Long story short, if you agitate it during this phase, it crystallizes. 

    Add this to your favorite coffee and viola! Save yourself $4 bucks!

    Thanks kid for another great post. 

    • Thanks for your insights, Dave! I appreciate you and I’m glad the recipe worked for you. I’ll be taking some candy classes in culinary school some day so maybe I’ll know more about this kind of stuff. AND I still have to read Kenji’s Food Lab! Take care.

  5. You can add more water and recook it to take the graininess away. I’ve had this happen with other recipes and it doesn’t have to be a failure at all. I always wash down the sides of the container it is cooking in several times with a pastry brush and hot water. I like to do mine in the microwave. Give it a try and see if you can salvage it for at least an ice cream topping. Good Luck.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

 

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

thanks for stopping by!

y’all come back now, ya hear?