Deviled Eggs

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This easy Deviled Eggs recipe is my family’s most trusted and the only one you’ll ever need. Homemade Deviled Eggs are the perfect party snack or brunch menu idea.

Deviled eggs on a round wooden platter.


 

Deviled eggs earn their fiery moniker because they can be devilishly spicy. My homemade Deviled Eggs err on the milder side thanks to mustard and paprika, but some recipes include cayenne pepper or hot sauce. Start with my base recipe for classic Deviled Eggs, then spice things up to match your heat preference.

Recipe ingredients

Labeled ingredients for deviled eggs.

At a Glance: Here is a quick snapshot of what ingredients are in this recipe.
Please see the recipe card below for specific quantities.

Ingredient and equipment notes

  • Eggs: Every Deviled Egg recipe begins with a pot of water. Click here for a refresher on how to hard-boil eggs (the recipe below will also walk you through it).
  • Dried mustard: Or twice as much prepared mustard condiment.
  • Piping bag: A cupcake decorator or piping bag with a large tip can make quick work out of stuffing beautiful, restaurant-quality Deviled Eggs. A zip-top bag with the corner cut off will also work well, or for a low-fuss, casual look, simply use a spoon to scoop the filling into the egg whites.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Fill a medium saucepan with about 1 inch of water (about 2 cups) and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Place eggs in a steamer basket and lower into the saucepan. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook for 13 minutes.
Cooking hard-boiled eggs in a saucepan.
  1. Set up an ice bath by filling a large bowl with ice and cold water. When eggs are done, use tongs or a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the hot water and submerge them under the cold water to cool, about 5 minutes.
Hard-boiled eggs in ice water after cooking.
  1. Once the eggs have cooled, roll them around in the ice water to gently crack them. Remove and discard shell.
Peeling hard boiled eggs on a cutting board.
  1. Halve eggs lengthwise. Scoop out yolks and place in a small bowl. Mash yolks with a fork. Stir in mayonnaise, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce and mix until thoroughly combined.
Deviled egg filling in a clear bowl next to a wooden cutting board with hard boiled egg white halves on it.
  1. Pipe filling into egg halves or spoon rounded teaspoonfuls. Garnish with dill or paprika, if desired.
Someone filling hard boiled egg white halves with yellow yolk filling.

Do you need an egg cooker?

If you don’t have the expertise to make hard boiled eggs or don’t want to fiddle with a stovetop, I LOVE using my Elite Gourmet Rapid Egg Cooker that my mom recommended to me back in 2012. It’s held up as one of the best egg cookers and makes it foolproof to make hard and soft boiled eggs for recipes like deviled eggs! It can fit up to 7 eggs at once and you can get it on Amazon for $16.99.

Recipe tips and variations

  • Yield: My Deviled Egg recipe makes 24 pieces (halves) or 12 servings, 2 pieces each. Multiply this recipe as needed, cooking eggs in batches in Step 1 and 2. Proceed to Step 3 with all the eggs you plan to stuff to save time.
  • Storage: Store leftovers covered in the refrigerator for up to 4 days.
  • Make ahead: The eggs can be hard-boiled up to 7 days in advance.
  • Paleo and Whole30 Compatible: Use an Whole30 compatible mayonnaise such as Primal Kitchen Mayo.
  • Build the ultimate brunch drink: Deviled Eggs and crispy bacon strips act as the garnish for my next-level good Bacon and Eggs Bloody Mary cocktails. Prepare to steal the show with this Deviled Eggs dress-up!
  • More Deviled Egg garnish ideas: In addition to or instead of paprika and dill, consider crowning your eggs with chopped chives, capers, small cornichons, crumbled cooked bacon, thinly-sliced smoked salmon, diced ham, crumbled feta or blue cheese, or thinly-sliced jalapeño. And of course hot sauce (Sriracha, Cholula, Tabasco, Tapatío; this is your party!) is ideal to crank up the heat.
Deviled eggs on a rectangular white platter.

Frequently Asked Questions

Why do we call them deviled eggs?

The “devil” in deviled eggs means a fried or boiled dish that highly spiced or seasoned. While these deviled eggs are pretty tame as-is (to be kid and family friendly), it’s easy to make them devilishly spicy with hot sauce or cayenne pepper.

How long can you keep hard-boiled eggs?

Store hard-boiled eggs for up to 7 days in the refrigerator.

More ways with eggs

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Deviled eggs on a round wooden platter.

Deviled Eggs

This easy Deviled Eggs recipe is my family’s most trusted and the only one you’ll ever need. They are creamy, delicious, and a guaranteed crowd-pleaser!
Cook Time 15 minutes
Total Time 15 minutes
Servings 12 servings (2-pieces each)
Course Appetizer
Cuisine American
Calories 106
5 from 54 votes

Ingredients 

Instructions 

  • Fill a medium saucepan with about 1 inch of water (about 2 cups) and bring to a rolling boil over high heat. Place eggs in a steamer basket and lower into the saucepan. Cover, reduce heat to medium-low, and cook for 13 minutes.
  • Set up an ice bath by filling a large bowl with ice and cold water. When eggs are done, use tongs or a slotted spoon to remove the eggs from the hot water and submerge them under the cold water to cool, about 5 minutes. Once the eggs have cooled, roll them around in the ice water to gently crack them. Remove and discard shell.
  • Halve eggs lengthwise. Scoop out yolks and place in a small bowl. Mash yolks with a fork. Stir in mayonnaise, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce and mix until thoroughly combined.
  • Pipe filling into egg halves or spoon rounded teaspoonfuls. Garnish with dill or paprika if desired.

Recipe Video

Nutrition

Serving: 2 piecesCalories: 106kcalCarbohydrates: 1gProtein: 6gFat: 9gSaturated Fat: 2gPolyunsaturated Fat: 4gMonounsaturated Fat: 3gTrans Fat: 1gCholesterol: 166mgSodium: 107mgPotassium: 66mgFiber: 1gSugar: 1gVitamin A: 242IUVitamin C: 1mgCalcium: 26mgIron: 1mg
Did you make this recipe?Tag @culinaryhill on Instagram so we can admire your masterpiece! #culinaryhill
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Meggan Hill is a classically-trained chef and professional writer. Her meticulously-tested recipes and detailed tutorials bring confidence and success to home cooks everywhere. Meggan has been featured on NPR, HuffPost, FoxNews, LA Times, and more.

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Comments

  1. The format of this is not user friendly. I like to a complete list of the ingredients and I can’t easily find them in this post!

    1. Hi Kay, sorry for the confusion. You can find the complete list of ingredients in the large recipe box that is above where you were able to leave this comment, or by clicking the “Jump to Recipe” button at the top of the page. I hope this helps! – Meggan

  2. Love these things!!
    I too have read where, to center the yolks, lay the egg carton level on its side, then refrigerate for 8 hours. The yolks are supposed to settle centered, then cook as usual. Since I do mine in the instant pot for super easy to peel eggs – age seems not to matter, I will try laying them on their sides in the cooker instead. On trivet or egg rack, 1 cup water, 4min at high, 4min at natural release, quick release, ice water bath. Peel. Yum!5 stars

  3. I loved the touch of dill in this deviled eggs recipe! I make this all the time but never with dill, this is my go-to recipe from now on! Thanks for sharing!5 stars

  4. Sounds like a fine recipe. I love deviled eggs but my dr says im only allowed 2 eggs a week due to my cholosterol. So deviled eggs it is. 😆 when i make large baches i put the filling in a ziploc and cut the corner off to make filling the halves much easier. 

  5. I have to wonder if the originator of deviled eggs had any idea as to how fast they would disappear at a gathering. 5 stars

  6. Like Meggan said I almost skipped the recipe.  I am glad I didn’t.  I will be trying this one.  I don’t like a lot of ingredients in my recipes.  I like the simple is better approach.  I will be trying piercing the small end of the egg before boiling as it is too help center the yolk without placing or turning the carton around in the fridge.  If I have just a few egg and no recipes needing them they end up in a pot of hot water.5 stars

    1. Such a great tip about piercing the eggs! I haven’t mastered the art of centering the eggs yolk yet, but I’ve also heard about turning the carton on its side. But I just never remember!

    1. I am going to try that next time! It sounds perfect. Or possibly in addition to Worcestershire sauce. Thanks Linda!

  7. Love your recipe, I almost didn’t click on it because every recipe I’ve come across for deviled eggs had sweet pickle in it ! Yuck, big time. Yours, is almost identical to mine, except I don’t use quite as much worcestershire because I add a dash of liquid smoke also. I use a spicy brown mustard and a very small amount of onion minced extremely fine.
    Love them for breakfast; also Meg’s mention a bit of crab. Having grown up on the Texas gulf coast, I Love almost almost all seafood though I can do without octopus…I also love her mention of “many deviled egg versions”, it made my mouth water because I really have a “thing” for deviled eggs, pico de gallo & different types of salsas. Wish Meg could remember some of the names of the varieties of deviled eggs. Yum! Have a blessed day everyone! Meggan thank you for an outstanding blog, you always post truly delicious recipes!5 stars

    1. Thanks so much for the comment, Margo! I tried the dash-of-liquid-smoke in my deviled eggs just about a month ago or so, then I stuck a piece of fried prosciutto on top. That’s how a local burger joint makes them, but they charge $4 for 2 halves or whatever, I knew I had to make it that way myself! I can’t wait to try crab in my next batch, too. I was looking at the restaurant menu Meg suggested and they don’t really give much detail – a classic version and a “seafood combo” version. I, too, am obsessed with deviled eggs. I feel like I could eat them anytime! I’ve never had pickle relish in them, either, but it sounds all wrong. 😉 Thanks so much for your kind words, have a wonderful week and take care!!

    2. I use finely diced sweet pickles in my deviled eggs. NEVER pickle relish. (It’s the difference between day and night-pickle relish VS diced sweet pickles) Also a teaspoon or two of white vinegar for 12 eggs. Oh my goodness! I could eat this for days on end!!!5 stars

  8. I read if you reverse the eggs in the carton the day before boiling, the yolks will move towards the center giving the deviled eggs a more uniformed look.  Have not tried this method yet.5 stars

    1. Judy, I’ve heard that too! Or I think what I heard was to place the egg carton on its side which produces the same effect. It probably works, I just never remember to do that! 😉

  9. Can’t wait to try these. We went to a great restaurant the last time we were in D.C. near the White House called Founding Farmers. Many deviled egg versions on the menu (crab, etc!). Hard to get a table, but you must try!5 stars

  10. I love deviled eggs because you can customize the filling with just about anything, great recipe. I like them from breakfast too.5 stars